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Mini-Grant Program

IEN cohosts a unique mining mini-grant program with the Western Mining Action Network (WMAN)  In 2017, the IEN-WMAN Mining Mini-Grant Program provided more than $200,000 in $3,000 increments to grassroots organizations across the US and Canada.

This program is nearly unique in its form and scope and is of tremendous value to community-based organizations, many of whom have very few opportunities to access financial support outside their own individual pockets.

Download a copy of the 2016-17 Mini-Grant application form.

You can review some of the past grantees and a short description of the project for which they received funding, please click on one of the grant cycles below.

If your organization is working on issues that are effecting your community and would like to receive a notice when we are accepting grant applications, please sign up for our email newsletter HERE or on the homepage of this website, and choose “mining” as one of the issues you’d like to receive information. You can change or cancel your subscription at any time.

Northwatch, Ontario

NorthwatchA founding member of Mining Watch Canada, Northwatch was founded in 1988 to provide a regional voice on environmental concerns in northeastern Ontario. Work over the last two decades has focused on mining, forestry, and energy issues, both at the policy and project level, as well as, successfully campaigning against a series of proposals to bring foreign wastes – solid waste, medical waste, toxic waste, and nuclear waste – for dumping in northeastern Ontario. Northwatch holds a seat on the Ontario Minister’s Mining Act Advisory Committee, and works with local groups and concerned residents, including trade unions and First Nations, in responding to mining-related projects.

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Northeastern Minnesotans for Wilderness, Minnesota

NMWorgNortheastern Minnesotans for Wilderness (NMW) was founded in 1996 by local citizens from wilderness-edge communities to protect the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness. Today, NMW is the lead organization in a national coalition known as the Campaign to Save the Boundary Waters, which seeks to protect Boundary Waters, its watersheds, and Voyageurs National Park from proposed large-scale sulfide-ore copper mining projects in the Superior National Forest.

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New Mexico Environmental Law Center, New Mexico

NewMexicoLawCenterThe New Mexico Environmental Law Center (Law Center) is a nonprofit, public interest law firm founded in 1987 that provides low-cost and free legal services to primarily low-income and minority clients on environmental matters throughout the state of New Mexico. The Law Center’s mission is to protect New Mexico’s natural environment and to achieve environmental justice for the state’s communities through legal representation, policy advocacy, and public education.

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KAIROS: Canadian Ecumenical Justice Initiatives, Ontario

KAIROSKAIROS, founded in 2001, is a grassroots organization based in Toronto and made up of eleven national churches and church organization, twenty-three international partner organization, and Indigenous partner organizations in Canada. KAIROS works for Indigenous rights, ecological and social justice, and human rights in Canada and globally, relying on our strong international partnerships.

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Mini Grant Recipents - February 2017
  1. Alaska Clean Water Advocacy, Alaska

The Alaska Clean Water Advocacy (ACWA) has been a project of the Earth Island Institute since 1998. ACWA’s work is grounded in supporting the Clean Water Act principle that all waters in the nation should be “fishable and swimmable.” For nearly twenty years  their efforts have focused on challenging the authorization of industrial “mixing zones” (dilution-pollution zones in public waters) and requiring states to apply the Clean Water Act’s Anti-degradation Policy (ADP) that requires states to formally identify the quality of its waters and only allow discharge permits that protect the existing uses of those waters.

Alaska Clean Water Advocacy will use their funding to support their organizing, outreach, and media efforts to stop the development of the Palmer Project (a.k.a. Constantine Mine) in S.E. Alaska. Work will include ensuring the State of Alaska adopts a functional evaluation mechanism for the designation of Outstanding National Resource Waters (ONRWs,) and supporting the Chilkat Indian Village’s nomination of the Chilkat River in Southeast Alaska to be the State’s first ONRW.

  1. Alliance for Appalachia, Kentucky

The Alliance for Appalachia is a decade old, regional coalition with the goals of ending mountaintop removal, putting a halt to destructive coal technologies, and supporting a sustainable and just Appalachia. They believe abolishing mountaintop removal and supporting economic transition to be important elements of systemic change in our nation’s deeply troubled energy, economic, and environmental policies.

The Alliance for Appalachia will use their mini-grant to host regional steering meetings to plan and strategize for their “Our Water Our Future Campaign.” Specifically, funding will enable low-income Appalachian leaders to attend and work collaboratively to build mechanisms of support and shared analysis across organizations, campaigns, and state-lines to strengthen their movement.

  1. Barriere Lake Solidarity, Quebec

Barriere Lake Solidarity has been working with the Algonquins of Barriere Lake since 2008 to support community members in the protection of their territory and community well being. They have assisted their community in opposing mining on their territory, including planned drilling by Copper One, and in resisting government intervention in the community’s governance process.

Barriere Lake Solidarity will use their mini-grant to maintain a land protection camp on the main access road to mining claims in the heart of their territory, where 14 proposed exploratory drilling sites are located. While those claims may be temporarily suspended, the First Nation will continue efforts beyond the camp to seek a moratorium on mining activity on their territory, and the cancellation of all companies’ mining claims. Funding will be used for travel, food, and supplies.

  1. Coal River Mountain Watch, West Virginia

Coal River Mountain Watch was formed in 1998 by a group of citizens concerned about the growing problem of mountaintop removal coal mining (MTR). Their mission is to stop the destruction of their communities and environment by mountaintop removal mining, to improve their quality of life, and to help rebuild sustainable communities. They have become one of the major forces fighting to end

MTR, and, in 2003, their Judy Bonds won the Goldman Environmental Prize, providing a major boost to their efforts to publicize the devastation of MTR.

Mini-grant funding will be used to support the Coal River Intensive Monitoring Project (CRIMP), which will aggressively monitor the  active and pending mountaintop removal (MTR) coal mines on and around Coal River Mountain. This project will include ground monitoring and aerial drone surveillance for boundary violations, sediment ditch condition, and other potential permit violations. Water sampling of adjacent streams may be conducted if there is a safe and secure way to do so.

  1. Conservation Council of New Brunswick, New Brunswick

The Conservation Council of New Brunswick was founded in 1969 and is New Brunswick’s longest running environmental charity and one of the province’s leading public advocates for environmental protection. The Conservation Council, a member of the UN’s Global 500 Roll of Honour, works to find practical solutions to help families and citizens, educators, governments, and businesses to “protect the air we breathe, the water we drink, our precious marine ecosystem and the land, including the forest, that supports us.”

Funding will be used to host a public event to raise public awareness about the lessons learned from the Mount Polley Mine disaster and the Mount Polley recommendations for tailings waste management during a time when the government is set to approve the Sisson mine/tailings project on unceded Wolastoq territory in the Canadian province of New Brunswick. The event also will forge cross-country networks with indigenous and nonindigenous people working to protect communities affected by mining.

  1. Center for Science in Public Participation, Montana

Center for Science in Public Participation (CSP2) was organized in 1997 to provide technical assistance to public interest groups on  issues related to mining and water quality. Technical analyses focus on the environmental effects of water quality contamination from mining, application of new mine design and effluent treatment technologies, reclamation, and risks to fisheries. CSP2 additionally  provides assistance to communities and tribes on understanding the technical issues around mine projects so that they may have a stronger voice in negotiations and decisions.

This mini-grant funding will be used by CSP2 in an effort to download data related to the environmental impacts of mining from  government websites before the data are removed from public access and possibly destroyed.

  1. Ch’óóshgai Forest Community Planning Project, Arizona

The Ch’óóshgai Forest Community Planning Project has its origins in 2015 when two community members “crashed” a Navajo Nation legislative and administrative work session regarding the development of a new Integrated Resource Management Plan (IRMP) for Navajo Nation forestlands. They discovered that early planning included greatly expanding sand and gravel mining as well as  commercial logging and oil and gas drilling in the Chuska region. The organization’s members began organizing to insist on community participation and representation in any decisionmaking regarding the region’s forests and water.

Mini-grant funding will be used to inform and organize the Diné forest communities of the Chuska Mountain and Defiance Plateau region regarding environmental threats to the region’s watershed, groundwater, and forests from a series of recently initiated resource extraction proposals that include the expansion of sand and gravel mining. The goal of the Ch’óóshgai Forest Community Planning Project is to inspire and facilitate grassroots community participation in the Navajo Nation’s planning process for these proposals. Planned activities include the creation of a video, brochure, and PSAs, which also would be translated into Navajo.

  1. Deer Tail Press, Minnesota

Deer Tail Press, LLC was founded in 2006 to serve as the agent for the publication of the book, “The Buzzards Have Landed! – The Real Story of the Flambeau Mine.” The book, gifted to many schools, public libraries, and tribal governments, chronicles the grassroots resistance movement to the Flambeau Mine and exposes various mining company maneuvers designed to squelch opposition. It also includes a detailed analysis of mining regulations impacting the project and shows how groundwater and surface water quality fared under those regulations, thereby giving others ammunition to use whenever the Flambeau Mine is featured by industry representatives as a “model mine.”

Deer Tail Press will use their funding to help cover the cost of hiring a hydrogeologist to bring science into the debate occurring around an effort to repeal Wisconsin’s 19-year old mining moratorium law. The consultant’s primary role will be to provide fact-based information regarding the environmental performance of modern metal sulfide mines in the United States, Canada, and around the world.

  1. Douglas Indian Association, Alaska

The Douglas Indian Association (DIA) is the historical Douglas and Juneau-based, Tlingit Tribe with tribal members of both the T’aaḵu Kwáan and A’akw Kwáan ancestry. The Douglas Indian Association became a federally recognized tribe inThrough the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA) of 1971, the State of Alaska conveyed lands to Native corporations in Southeast Alaska, but no lands, especially in the Douglas or Juneau area, were conveyed to the Tribe.

Douglas Indian Association will use their mini-grant to organize a Taku boat trip, following on the heels of two prior successful  excursions. The purpose of the event will be to focus on the Tulsequah Chief mine cleanup issue, generate more attention, inspire additional community interest, and shape a formal DIA position regarding reclamation and a future for the Taku beyond mining toward safeguarding the watershed’s outstanding ecological and cultural values.

  1. Earthworks, D.C.

Earthworks (then the Mineral Policy Center) was founded in 1988 by Phil Hocker, Mike McCloskey and former Secretary of the Interior Stewart L. Udall to help reform mining laws and practices. In 2005, the Mineral Policy Center and the Oil and Gas Accountability  Project joined forces to become Earthworks. The organization is dedicated to protecting communities and the environment from the adverse impacts of mineral and energy development while promoting sustainable solutions. While their long-term mining reform objectives seek to change the rules of the game by which the mining industry is allowed to play, the organization’s work with impacted communities achieves immediate and tangible results in protecting people and the environment from mining’s impacts.

Earthworks will use their grant to hire an economics expert to develop comments in support of new rules under consideration by the  EPA for finalization in December 2017, which will require mining companies to provide financial assurance for the risks associated with hazardous releases. Their goal is to respond to unanticipated Executive Orders issued by Donald Trump that preclude new rules from being issued that impose a cost on industry.

  1. Friends of the Stikine Society, British Columbia

Friends of the Stikine Society (FOSS), founded in 1980, is a grassroots organization formed to support Tahltan efforts to halt five BC Hydro dams on the Stikine and Iskut Rivers. FOSS continued their involvement until 2000 when the area designated for the dams was given park status. The organization’s main focus is to network information as well as maintain relationships with community members.

They now work to keep mining development to a sane cultural, social, and environmentally secure level in the Stikine, Iskut, Unuk,  Skeena, Nass, Taku, & Finlay watersheds, aiming for 50% of the area to be protected with no mineral development zones to conserve as much as possible in one of the remaining roadless areas in North America.

Friends of the Stikine Society will use their funding to circuit ride electronically and on the ground in Northwest BC, including the transboundary area with Alaska. Their goal is to continue building relationships and to ally and collaborate with First Nations, Tribes, NGO’s, and settler communities, thereby extending the flow of information on best available mining practices for land use planning for cultural and ecological integrity.

  1. Great Basin Resource Watch, Nevada

Great Basin Resource Watch was founded in 1994 by representatives from the environmental, Native American, and scientific  communities with a mission to protect the air, water, land, and communities both human and nonhuman in the Great Basin from the adverse affects of resource extraction and industrial development. The organization works to raise public awareness, change the  culture of government agencies to take a more protective and precautionary tack in permitting mines that form pit lakes, increase accountability of the mining industry, support community actions for dealing with cleanup, and promote monitoring. Mini-grant funds will be used to prevent the proposed Mt Hope Molybdenum Mine from contaminating surface and groundwater; depleting groundwater at the expense of Public Water Reserves (public springs), ranchers, and farmers in the region; and generally destroying the environs around Mt. Hope. Specifically, they will review the project’s Supplemental EIS, and document the viability of the Public Water Reserves, which is an issue that the court has not yet addressed, by examining the use and flow of the springs and working with ranchers, farmers, and Eureka County to accomplish this goal.

  1. Haul No!, Arizona

Haul No! was founded in the late fall of 2016 out of the realization that no organization was addressing the threat that uranium ore transport poses to native and rural communities on the haul route from the Canyon Mine to the White Mesa Mill. Their team members have protested the Canyon Mine through administrative processes and litigation efforts over the last five years, and have now come together to form a community-based line of defense in the event that the legal system fails to stop the Canyon Mine’s operation.

Haul No! will use mini-grant funding to organize an awareness & action tour that will be held in Spring and Summer of 2017 along the proposed uranium haul route of the Canyon Mine in Arizona to the White Mesa Uranium Mill in Utah. Through community education and engagement, Haul No! intends to spread awareness and to stimulate action – including providing non-violent direct action training – to ensure sacred sites, the Grand Canyon, and their communities are safeguarded from this deadly toxic threat. Funding will help cover travel, lodging, meals, printing, and materials.

  1. Kanawha Forest Coalition, West Virginia

The Kanawha Forest Coalition formed in early 2014 with the goal of stopping the 413 acre KD#2 mountaintop removal strip mine, which was proposed immediately adjacent to the nearly 10,000-acre Kanawha State Forest and within 500 meters of homes, and with the broader goal of building regional awareness of and resistance to strip mining. They are currently focused on pushing the  Department of Environmental Protection to properly enforce reclamation requirements at the shutdown KD#2 mine and to hold the mining company accountable to ongoing water quality issues. They’ve also extended their monitoring efforts to other area mines.

Mini-grant funding will be used to purchase in-stream water monitoring equipment to be deployed below discharge points of the now  closed KD#2  mine to record hourly monitoring of stream conditions (pH and conductivity) and obtain a consistent record of non-compliant mine discharges. They believe the coal company may be falsifying water data and will be comparing their data to the data submitted by the company in order to determine whether falsifications or omissions are occurring.

15. Ketchikan Indian Corporation, Alaska

Ketchikan Indian Community has 5,712 tribal citizens who are predominantly of Tlingit, Haida and Tsimpsian descent. Their cultures have evolved around the use of coastal natural resources over thousands of years. With two of its tribes having migrated from Canada in the last several hundred years, there are strong tribal and family connections between Alaska and Canada’s first nation peoples. The coastal natural resources in this part of northwestern BC and southeastern Alaska are important to the cultural existence of the first nations of both nations, and, consequently, the Ketchikan Indian Community is committed to their protection.

Funding will be used to conduct an in-person meeting of the United Tribal Transboundary Working Group (UTTWG). The working group was established in 2014 in response to the rapid development of large mines and related infrastructure occurring in the Canadian headwaters of rivers that support communities and culture. The 15 communities represented by the UTTWG are generally remote and none are connected by road. In-person attendance at this meeting, to be held in Ketchikan at the Tribe’s office, will ensure a quorum to provide for elections, by-law changes, formation of subcommittees, and conduction of business.

  1. Klabona Keepers and Beyond Boarding, British Columbia

Klabona Keepers are Tahltan elders and youth working to protect the Tl’abane, headwaters of the Nass, Skeena, and Stikine Rivers, from large-scale mining and fracking through traditional stewardship, direct action, and community engagement. The organization has won victories against Royal Dutch Shell, Fortune Minerals Anthracite Coal Project, Firesteel Inc.’s Copper/Gold deposit development, and Black Hawk Drilling, and has achieved a moratorium on oil and gas development.

Beyond Boarding is a group of snowboarders, surfers, artists and friends that strive to stand up against environmental and social injustices. They work together as a collective to share the voices of front line communities and take action to move towards a better future, and have produced various short films and fundraisers to support the fight against mining in the Sacred Headwaters by the Klabona Keepers.

Mini-grant funding will be used to create stewardship programming for the Sacred Stewardship Elders and Youth Centre, which will be  the first community inspired Resistance, Art & Recreational centre in the heart of the Tahltan territory known as “Sacred Headwaters.” The facility will be built from the ground up by community members and volunteers, to empower youth and highlight Tahltan stewardship of their traditional territory.

Programming will include weekly events, art facilitators, outdoor trips, and elders and youth events. A mural will showcase the fight  against mining in the Sacred Headwaters, while the Arts & Outdoor Programming will integrate themes of stewardship and  conservation to the youth.

  1. Native American Educational Technologies, Wisconsin

Native American Educational Technologies, Inc. (NAET) began in the mid-1980’s during the Mole Lake Sokaogon Chippewa verses  Exxon battle over metallic sulfide mining in the Ceded Territory of northern Wisconsin. Since 2001, they have faced numerous tribal preservation struggles and have worked with many tribes and nontribal environmental groups to help preserve clean air, water, land, and treaty rights, and to protect hunting/fishing and gathering. NAET has partnered with IndianCountryTV.com to become the main source for exchange of information, traveling thousands of miles from reservations to the state capitol and back again to provide online/TV coverage of hearings, rallies, and ceremonies all centered around protecting homelands from mining and tar sands  pipelines.

NAET will use their grant to respond to a move by mining industry lobbyists/legislators who seek to remove Wisconsin’s protective mining moratorium law within the 2017 legislative session, which would allow companies to mine at least half a dozen mines within Chippewa ceded territory, including the ore deposit at Mole Lake Sokaogon reservation and a proposed mine upstream from the Bad River reservation. NAET will produce printed materials, articles, and online stories, and will hire several professionals to help create these materials. They will assist tribal councils in distributing information to promote rallies and actions designed to raise awareness and support.

  1. Northwoods Niijji Enterprises Community, Wisconsin

Northwoods NiiJii Enterprise Community, Inc. is a partnership between the Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa, the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin and the Sokaogon Chippewa Community of Mole Lake, together with eight municipal partners in northern Wisconsin.

Northwoods NiiJii Enterprise Community will use their funding to bring in technical experts to present at the Third Annual Mining Alternatives Summit.

The Mining Alternative Summit is a tribally organized collaborative summit that brings together tribal interests and grass roots efforts to better understand the threats to mother earth from mining. This year it is sponsored by the Tribes of the Chippewa Federation and hosted by the Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians.

  1. Organized Village of Kasaan, Alaska

The Organized Village of Kasaan (OVK) is a federally recognized tribal government that was established October 15, 1938, and is a  501(c) 3 non-profit corporation. The organization consists of a seven member tribal council that serves 100 plus tribal memberships.

Funding will be used to conduct an in-person meeting of the United Tribal Transboundary Working Group (UTTWG), which will be attended by tribal representatives from the Organized Village of Kasaan. The working group was established in 2014 in response to the rapid development of large mines and related infrastructure occurring in the Canadian headwaters of rivers that support communities and culture. The 15 communities represented by the UTTWG are generally remote and none are connected by road. In-person attendance at this meeting, to be held in Ketchikan, will ensure a quorum to provide for elections, by-law changes, formation of sub-committees, and conduction of business.

  1. Organized Village of Saxman, Alaska

The Organized Village of Saxman is a federally recognized tribal government that was established on June 18, 1936. The Organized Village of Saxman is also a 501(c)3 non-profit corporation. The small village is located on the southwestern coast of Revillagigedo Island, two miles south of Ketchikan on South Tongass Highway. The Village of Saxman has nearly 400 tribal members and employs five full-time staff for the administration of the tribal government.

Funding will be used to conduct an in-person meeting of the United Tribal Transboundary Working Group (UTTWG), which will be attended by tribal representatives from the Organized Village of Saxman. The working group was established in 2014 in response to the rapid development of large mines and related infrastructure occurring in the Canadian headwaters of rivers that support communities and culture. The 15 communities represented by the UTTWG are generally remote and none are connected by road. In-person attendance at this meeting, to be held in Ketchikan, will ensure a quorum to provide for elections, by-law changes, formation of sub-committees, and conduction of business.

  1. Rivers Without Borders, California

Rivers Without Borders (RWB) was formed in 1999 to raise awareness of the outstanding ecological and cultural values of the wild BC – Alaska transboundary watersheds and to promote ecosystem based planning and stewardship toward safeguarding those values. The six transboundary watersheds are largely intact and, not coincidentally, ecologically rich and productive, especially relative to wild salmon. Unfortunately, the Canadian headwaters of several of these river systems are threatened by major mining development proposals which RWB is confronting.

They engage commercial fishing organizations, communities, First Nations and Tribes, NGOs, scientists, agencies, media, lawyers, and others to leverage conservation.

Rivers Without Borders will use their mini-grant funding to work with the Taku River Tlingit First Nation to address reclamation and the acid mine drainage legacy in the Taku Watershed. Following the Chieftain bankruptcy, they want to help move the B.C Government beyond the idea that developing another mine, the Tulsequah Chief Mine, is the solution to the area’s acid drainage problems. Funding will help pay for travel and lodging.

  1. Secwepemc’ulecw Grassroots Movement, British Columbia

The Secwepemc’ulecw Grassroots Movement group, led by the Shuswap people, was formed to raise awareness, educate, and  support the “Secwepemc Rights & Titles” for the people and Mother Earth.

Mini-Grant funds will be used to develop a communications network and strategy to streamline communications and dispersal of information on mines currently operating or proposing to operate within Secwepemc’ulecw. This will include contracting with a desktop publisher and website designer to create a brochure and outreach materials and to design a website.

  1. Silver Valley Community Resource Center, Idaho

The Silver Valley Community Resource Center was founded in 1986, approximately 3 years after the Superfund site was designated, by non-traditional representatives from the affected community, churches, unions, including the Idaho Teachers and United  Steelworker’s, social service agencies, and the medical community. Their mission is to “improve the quality of life for all people of the Silver Valley, specific to environmental justice, economic development, housing/homelessness and health.” Their priority is working with agencies to cleanup a century and millions of tons of lead and heavy metals, i.e.; the nations largest Superfund NPL site.

The Silver Valley Community Resource Center will use their mini-grant to advance EPA accountability of cleanup and protection of human health in the nation’s largest lead site after a confirmation that EPA Bunker Hill project staff were covering up and withholding ongoing environmental and lead human health data. The Center will distribute information, demand closure of the Old Mission Repository, and build support for settlement funds to be used for the establishment of a community lead health clinic/center. Funding will cover travel, a computer consultant, and outreach.

  1. Statewide Organizing for Community Empowerment Resource Project(SOCM), Tennessee

SOCM was founded in Tennessee’s rural coalfield communities in response to virtually unregulated strip mining of coal, which blasted the sides of steep mountains onto homes, roads, and streams and resulted in insufficient revenue for schools, roads, and other services. Many of their issue campaigns are fights against corporations and government entities that are devastating communities by polluting the water or air, threatening public health, and/or disproportionately affecting communities of color, low income, and working-class people.

SOCM will use their mini-grant to help organize community members in the coal producing areas of Tennessee to block new mines and help to close and remediate problems from existing mines. This will include building economic development opportunities in the coalfields to help empower people in new economies without the dominance of coal. Their work will involve citizen monitoring; targeted education of key decision-makers about issues such as the AML fund, the POWER-Plus Plan to assist communities in diversifying their economies, and the RECLAIM Act; permit challenges and comments; public outreach; organized action; and litigation, if needed.

  1. Sierra Fund, California

Since 2006, the Sierra Fund has worked to address the ongoing environmental, cultural, and human health impacts of historic mining in the Sierra Nevada region. They support organizations and communities by increasing public and private funding in the region, advocating for policy changes, and bringing intellectual resources that build capacity to restore and protect the resiliency of California’s headwaters.

The Sierra Fund’s mini-grant will support their biennial Reclaiming the Sierra conference, which provides the opportunity for community advocates to gather with leaders in science and policy to address the lasting legacy of historic mining and continued resource extraction while collaborating on a vision of ecosystem and community resiliency. Specifically, funding will provide scholarships and travel stipends for two Nevada mining justice organizers to participate in the conference.

  1. Tsilhqot’in National Government, British Columbia

The Tsilhqot’in National Government (TNG) was established in 1989 to meet the needs and represent the six Tsilhqot’in communities  of Tl’etinqox, ʔEsdilagh, Yuneŝit’in, Tŝi Del Del and Xeni Gwet’in in their efforts to re-establish a strong political government structure. TNG has an obligation to its people to establish programs that reflect Tsilhqot’in Culture and Customs in every aspect of governance, and advocates on behalf of all Tsilhqot’in in the aspects of health, stewardship, education, and more.

The Tsilhqot’in National Government will use mini-grant funding to respond to Taseko Mine’s attempt to overturn the historic decision of 2014 in which the B.C. Government turned down the proposed “New Prosperity” mine in the heart of the Tsilhqotin territory. The mining company is challenging the legitimacy of the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act (CEAA) process.

Tsilhqot’in Nation Elders participated in court hearings in the past to oppose the proposed open-pit copper and gold mine, and will  travel to court again to testify on behalf of the CEAA process and their Aboriginal Rights and Title.

  1. Mining Action Group of the Upper Peninsula Environmental Coalition, Michigan

The Mining Action Group (MAG) is a grassroots effort to defend the clean water and wild places of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula from  the dangers of sulfide mining. MAG was previously known as Save the Wild U.P. At the end of 2016, Save the Wild U.P. merged with the Upper Peninsula Environmental Coalition (UPEC) to form the Mining Action Group (MAG), leveraging a combined 52 years of environmental stewardship. Founded in 1976, the Upper Peninsula Environmental Coalition’s purpose remains unchanged: to protect and maintain the unique environmental qualities of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan by educating the public and acting as a watchdog to industry and government.

The Mining Action Group will use their mini-grant to secure an independent technical review of a wetlands permit application for the  proposed Aquila Resources Back Forty mine project – an open-pit sulfide mine planned for the banks of the Menominee River in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. The technical review of the wetlands permit will help MAG identify and publicize significant threats to groundwater and surface water as they oppose the Aquila Back Forty project, and lend weight and credibility to their concerns.

Mini Grant Recipents - October 2016

1. ACT NOW, Wisconsin
ACT NOW, LLC, was organized in 2013 as a member-managed organization. Their mission is to educate people on frac-sand mining. ACT NOW has sponsored the Standing Against the Sand Storm conference, frac-sand awareness presentations, newspaper ads, a billboard, and yard signs. In addition to their public education work, the organization has taken legal action against two mines that would destroy their rural Wisconsin way of life and pollute water and air resources.

ACT Now will use their funding to develop educational programs to create a more effective and inspirational messaging campaign about their communities and the effects of frac-sand mining. They will hold workshops to develop a unifying, positive message that conveys the importance of the air, land, and water to the health and prosperity of their communities. Efforts to increase visibility will
include the design and construction of signage to be placed throughout the region.
2. Brooks Range Council, Alaska
The Brooks Range Council was formed by Alaskans in 2012 to defend the Brooks Range from a 220-mile industrial access road that would enable the state of Alaska and powerful mining interests to exploit the southern Brooks Range with large scale, open pit copper mining operations. The organization’s goal is to expose the economical, environmental and social folly of this proposal to protect their heritage; way of life; and the fish, moose, and caribou that feed and sustain them.

Mini-grant funding will be used by the Brooks Range Council to hire a consultant to provide technical review, interpretation of existing data, and expert testimony related to the geochemistry of the sought after massive sulfide deposit in the Ambler Mining District and the accompanying water quality risks. An analysis of impacts from the proposed road’s crossing of hundreds of creeks and several major rivers would also be included.
3. Chilkat Indian Village, Alaska
The Chilkat Indian Village is a federally recognized tribal government. Members reside in Klulwan, an Alaska Native village positioned on the banks of the Chilkat River in Southeast Alaska. Klukwan is located twenty-two miles north of Haines, Alaska. Their ancestral land base, which covered approximately 2.6 million acres, was reduced to an 898.6-acre reserve as miners, homesteaders, the Territory/State of Alaska and others staked claims on Chilkat land. In the 1990s, Nature Conservancy, which had been entrusted with the land by Klukwan Iron Ore, returned an additional 1,000 acres of ancestral lands to the tribe.

The Chilkat Indian Village will use their funding to continue partnering with Takshanuk Watershed Council and Lynn Canal Conservation to implement activities in a strategic plan that addresses large scale mineral exploration and mining in the Chilkat Valley, Haines, Alaska. They will develop a media message and education campaign for the Chilkat Valley Working Group to include a video and speaker series with presentations on acid mine drainage and the social impacts of mining.
4. Citizen’s Coal Council, Pennsylvania
The Citizen’s Coal Council was formed in 1989 by grassroots groups from Kentucky, Illinois, Tennessee, Pennsylvania, Virginia, the Rocky Mountain Region, and the Navajo Nation to provide a unified voice for all coalfield citizens and to demand environmental justice in response to violations perpetrated by the coal industry. The organization’s mission is to inform, empower, and work for and with communities affected by the mining, processing, and use of coal.

Citizen’s Coal Council will use their funding to provide travel scholarships for Hopi and Navajo citizens to attend a Surface Mining Control and Reclamation (SMCRA) Legal Workshop in Arizona in April 2017. The workshop will include public interest attorneys with knowledge of federal mining laws, water rights, and bankruptcy to respond to the Chapter 11 bankruptcy filed by Peabody Energy Coal Company. Peabody has been mining coal in northern Arizona on Hopi and Navajo Indian Reservations for over 50 years, causing material damage to tribal lands, waterways, springs, and groundwater resources of both tribes.

5. Comstock’s Resident Association, Nevada
The Comstock Residents Association is a Nevada community-based non-profit organization formed out of concern for the loss of community, the natural environment, and wildlife habitat, and in response to apprehension about the significant health hazards caused by industrial scale mining within a Superfund Site.

Funding will be used for attorney fees to pursue legal challenges related to an unlawful amendment of a county master plan and  changes in zoning that would allow mining within town limits close to residential areas, as well as a related public transparency lawsuit. Additionally an expert will be retained to assist in creating a statutory amendment during the 2017 Nevada Legislature to amend the rules governing the Comstock Historic District within the Virginia City National Historic Landmark and provide protections and oversight of cultural values and landforms.
6. Concerned Citizens and Retired Miners Association, Arizona
Concerned Citizens & Retired Miners Coalition is a grassroots group of citizens who: 1) reside in Superior, AZ, or do not reside locally, but are affiliated with relatives who are residents; 2) are retired hard-rock miners who previously worked in the now non-operational mine in Superior, AZ and were displaced due to mine closure or personal disability; 3) or individuals who are concerned that important U.S. public recreational land will be conveyed and lost to foreign mining companies for private use. The organization provides information, data, and outreach in opposition to the Resolution Copper Mine project/proposal, and is working to repeal Section 3003 (Oak Flat Land Exchange Bill), of the National Defense Authorization Act of 2015.

Concerned Citizens and Retired Miners Association will use their mini-grant for outreach and educational efforts to inform and advise  the residents of the AZ copper mining region and surrounding communities about the negative environmental impacts and destructive nature of the proposed Resolution Copper Mine located near Superior, AZ. Specifically, funding will be used for educational materials; travel, marketing, and advertising costs for conducting public meetings; and 3D scale models of the proposed mine to be used as
visual aids.

7. Dragoon Conservation Alliance, Arizona
Dragoon Conservation Alliance was revived in 2014 to combat a mining proposal by Excelsior Mining Co. The organization  successfully defeated a marble mine in the Dragoon Mountains in 2008. A small group of local residents holds community meetings and shares information about the mining operation and the water quality of the Willcox aquifer, which serves as the sole source of potable water for several municipalities and unincorporated communities.

Dragoon Conservation Alliance will use their funding to hire Consultant Tom Myers to review and analyze the Underground Injection Control and State Aquifer Protection permits submitted by Excelsior Mining to the EPA and Arizona Division of Water Resources, respectively, so that the organization can knowledgeably identify and comment on the Draft Permits when issued for public comment. Dr. Myers will provide information on the impacts and risks of Excelsior Mining Company’s project to extract copper from the North
Star Deposit at the base of the Gunnison Hills in Dragoon, Arizona using an in-situ sulfuric acid leaching process.

8. Friends of the Boundary Waters Wilderness, Minnesota
The Friends of the Boundary Waters Wilderness was established in 1976 to bring full wilderness protection to the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness (BWCAW). The organization has been protecting the wilderness character of the BWCAW and the Quetico-Superior ecosystem through advocacy, education and research. Their core work focuses on defending against activities that weaken  or violate laws protecting its wilderness character, including preventing pollution from proposed sulfide mining projects from impacting area waters, cultural resources, human use of the region, and wilderness character.

Friends of the Boundary Waters Wilderness will use their mini-grant to support the organization’s Building a Sustainable Future Campaign and its three main objectives of engaging citizens through sophisticated grassroots organizing, creating broad media pressure against current sulfide mining proposals, and providing an influential conservation voice at the Minnesota State Capitol. Funding will pay for travel, printing, supplies, and advertising.

9. Kalmiopsis Audubon Society, Oregon
Named for the Kalmiopsis Wilderness, the Kalmiopsis Audubon Society has been the primary local, conservation advocacy group in Curry County, Oregon for more than 35 years. Their mission is to protect the extraordinary and diverse natural habitats of the area, including old growth forests, stunning coastlines and wild rivers – for birds, fish, wildlife, and the next generations. Currently, their leading project is a campaign to protect lands at the headwaters of several National Wild and Scenic Rivers from plans to explore and develop 2 nickel-laterite deposits by securing a mineral withdrawal to prevent future claim staking and to trigger a validity review
of the associated claims.

Kalmiopsis Audubon Society will use their grant to pay for outreach and organizing, campaign materials, event supplies, and strategic ads that will help them reach their goal of advancing a proposed mineral withdrawal in the Kalmiopsis region of southwest Oregon through critical final stages to completion before the end of the Obama Administration.
10. Kuskokwim River Watershed Council, Alaska
The Kuskokwim River Watershed Council (KRWC) was created in 2009 to unite area tribes in cultivating a healthy respect for the land and water that they depend upon. The KRWC is a central hub for addressing environmental issues affecting the Kuskokwim region. Their mission is to maintain and promote a traditional subsistence lifestyle for the residents of the Kuskokwim River Watershed; to keep their land, water, and air unspoiled for their people; and to pass on abundant fish, wildlife and flora to future generations.

Kuskokwim River Watershed Council will use their funding to hire Dr. Tom Myers to participate in-person at an Army Corps of  Engineers (ACOE) hydrology and groundwater workshop in Anchorage associated with the Donlin Gold EIS. The native Village of Napaimute provided comments on the DEIS, and attached a review of groundwater modeling authored by Dr. Myers, which noted some potential impacts from the mine’s probable operation as well as some errors within the DEIS. Subsequently, Dr. Myers was invited by the ACOE to participate in the workshop. Participation by Dr. Myers on behalf of the Native Village of Napaimute, as well as all stakeholders in the Kuskokwim drainage, will strengthen the final Environmental Impact Statement and help protect the ecological integrity of Kuskokwom River.

11. Maverick County Environmental and Public Health Association, Texas
The Maverick County Environmental Association was formed in 2011 to oppose the open pit coal mine in Maverick County being  proposed by the Dos Republicas Coal Partnership (DRCP). This mine is only 3 miles from the city limits of Eagle Pass (which has a population of over 25,000 with 25,000 more living in the immediate vicinity) and within one mile of heavily populated subdivisions and 2 elementary schools. Their goal is to halt the operation of the Dos Republicas open pit coal mine in Maverick County and to prevent its further expansion through a multi-front program, which includes legal challenges.

Mini-grant funds will be used for legal assistance to appeal the wastewater discharge permit granted by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality to Dos Republicas Coal Partnership in a state district court. Court hearings will be held in Austin, TX , which is 220 miles from Eagle Pass, so funding will assist with travel and lodging expenses for members to attend the court hearings.

12. Paving Tundra, Alaska
Paving Tundra is a small grassroots media team of adventurers, photographers, writers and filmmakers who joined together in 2016 in the fight to protect the wild lands of the Brooks Range and the indigenous people who depend on them. They are committing time and energies into assisting the Brooks Range Council and the village councils of southern Brooks Range in protecting the land and  livelihood threatened by the Ambler Road construction and the development of the sulfide deposit in the Ambler Mining District.

Paving Tundra will use their mini-grant funding to provide a visual defense against the Ambler Road (proposed by the State of Alaska) and related open copper pit mine for the Brooks Range Council (BRC) by creating a visually, stunning, short video, which accurately illustrates the cultural and environmental realities of the area. The video will be shown at a gathering in which tribal representatives and BRC members will provide a compelling case to Alaska legislators to keep the Brooks Range free from copper pit mining and road development by connecting them to an indigenous livelihood and wilderness that may never be the same if the tundra is paved
and rivers polluted from this development.
13. Poo Ha Pah Healing Center, California
Pooha-Bah was founded in 2003 and received IRS tax-exempt status in 2004. The Pooha-Bah Healing Center is used by Western Shoshone leaders to hold healing and life ceremonies. The organization’s board of directors has created the Newe Sacred Sites Protection Program that continues to conduct programs for the protection of sites sacred to the Western Shoshone people including the Tosawihi Quarry (White Knife), Bah-Tsa- Gom-Bah (Rock Creek) and Mt. Tenabo threatened by mining.

Funding will be used to create an educational pamphlet about mining along the Amargosa River with the goal of enhancing public understanding of the mining cycle, its legacy, and the current threat from mining to the water that flows through Poo Ha Bah Healing Center into Death Valley. The project will locate and interview Native American elders to obtain their perspectives of the impact of mining on tribal culture. The booklet will incorporate historic information, historic photos, and tribal elder interviews to tell the story of
past, present, and future mining.
14. Radiation Monitoring Project, New Mexico
The Radiation Monitoring Project (RMP) was founded in 2014 by three grassroots organizations: Diné No Nukes (DNN); Sloths against Nuclear State (SANS); and Nuclear Energy Information Service (NEIS). Each of the founding groups serve communities affected by ionizing radiation emissions and contamination caused by active and closed facilities that are or were part of the Nuclear Fuel Chain. This includes communities affected by uranium mining and milling; national labs; waste sites; radiation “sacrifice zones;” and nuclear weapon testing, nuclear power plants/reactors, and other contaminated areas.

The Radiation Monitoring Project will use their funding to work with five organizations in South Dakota (each working against new uranium mining and/or watchdogging existing and abandoned uranium mines) to host a 2- day training on citizen monitoring of radiation. The training will consist of presentations by experts on the basics of radioactivity, health impacts of exposure to radiation from uranium and decay products, and hands-on training in the use of radiation detectors, water sampling, data collection, and
chain of custody protocol.

15. Snake River Waterkeeper, Idaho
The Snake River Waterkeeper (SRW) was founded in 2013 with the mission of “applying science and law to protect, restore, and sustain waters of the Snake River Basin.” To that end, SRW monitors water quality at more than 100 sites in the Basin from the headwaters in Grand Teton National Park to its confluence with the Columbia River near Kennewick, Washington. Using those data, they establish citizen standing and bring lawsuits to protect and restore the river’s water quality to ensure the Clean Water Act’s guarantee of “fishable, swimmable, drinkable water” to residents of Idaho, Wyoming, Oregon, Washington, and Native American Indian
Reservations relying upon this vital resource for subsistence, survival, and recreation.

The mini-grant received by Snake River Waterkeepers will be used to document illegal suction-dredge mining operations in coordination with the Nez Perce Tribe on the Clearwater and Salmon Rivers and their tributaries on reservation lands and in the Clearwater and Nez Perce National Forests. Work will entail research on the timing and location of planned illegal suction-dredge operations, documentation and reporting of Clean Water Act violations, and follow through to ensure prompt and complete  prosecution of violators intentionally harming endangered salmon and steelhead spawning grounds and populations.
16. To Nizoni Ani, Arizona
To Nizhoni Ani (TNA) was founded in 2001 to address Peabody Coal Company’s excessive drawdown and waste of the only potable water source the Navajo people have on Black Mesa. The organization has organized numerous campaigns through horse rides, non-violent actions, and intense community education. TNA campaigns include working with Hopi as Intervenors in the California Public  utility Commission (CPUC) to bring awareness to the impacts coal mining has on the water on Black Mesa.

To Nizoni Ani will use their funding to educate and prepare community members to respond to the recent release of the draft EIS for the NGS and Kayenta Mine Complex. The EIS, if approved, would allow the NGS/KMC to continue to operate until 2044. TNA also will prepare community members, including youth, to travel to San Francisco for the 9th Circuit Court Hearing on the TNA V.S. Blumenfeld challenge of EPA’s Final Rule on BART for the Navajo Generating Station.
17. Yukon Conservation Society, Yukon Territory
The Yukon Conservation Society (YCS) is a grassroots environmental non-profit organization, established in 1968. Their mandate is to pursue ecosystem well-being throughout the Yukon Territory, Canada, and beyond. The YCS acts as a ‘mining watchdog’ and pursues the vision that mining in the Yukon is undertaken responsibly and in such a way as to ensure that perpetual treatment of future mines upon closure is unnecessary, that mining occurs only in areas where such activities are environmentally and socio-economically acceptable, and that existing care and maintenance activities at abandoned mine sites should continue until a final closure plan has been developed and implemented.

The Yukon Conservation Society will use their mini-grant to create ten simple infograms on contaminants caused by mining activity such as copper, lead, arsenic, selenium, zinc, acid rock drainage, and others. The infograms will be used to inform the general public on mining contaminants and ensure a greater awareness of mining contamination issues. They also will support better and more informed public participation in Yukon environmental assessment processes for forthcoming mining projects. The infograms will be
available for use by other groups and will not be project-specific.

Mini Grant Recipents - June 2016

1. Aberdeen Neighbourhood Association, British Columbia
Established in 2014, Aberdeen Neighbourhood Association’s mission is to develop a
vibrant, healthy, and cohesive community in the Aberdeen Hills Neighbourhood.
Abderdeen Neighbourhood is made up of approximately 11,000 residents and has
been one of the fast growing neighbourhoods in the City of Kamloops. The
association has established the Ajax Sub-committee to review the proposal
presented by KGHM AJAX to the BC Environmental Assessment Office and
Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency – specifically assessing those valued
components that most affect the Aberdeen Neighbourhood including air quality
and health impacts, soil and slope stability, noise and vibration, property values,
and land use.
Aberdeen Neighbourhood Association will use their mini-grant to address
the impacts of the proposed AJAX open pit gold/copper mine on an urban
area by hiring an economic expert to assess the mine’s impacts on property
values, and to provide expert opinion. This project is one of several steps
that the organization is currently undertaking as it explores legal avenues
against government agencies and KGHM Ajax.
2. Black Mesa United–Dziłíjiin Bee Ahóta’, Arizona
Black Mesa United-Dziłíjiin Bee Áhóta’ Incorporated was founded in December
2009 by Black Mesa residents living within the Peabody Western Coal Company
leasehold areas. Black Mesa United serves as the primary resource for Navajos
living in the leasehold area that have been adversely affected by coal mining.
Mini-grant funding will be used by Black Mesa United to develop a tenminute
video documenting the voices of elders impacted by Peabody Coal
Mining on Black Mesa, AZ entitled “Voices from Dzilijiin-Part 2.” The video
will serve as an educational tool to inform others about the negative
impacts of mining, and to advocate for the elders living within the Peabody
Western Coal Company leasehold areas. This project is phase 2 of the
documentary “Voices from Dzilijiin” developed with a previous mini-grant
in 2010.
3. Clean Water Alliance, South Dakota
Clean Water Alliance was established in 2009 to prevent radioactive mining in the
Black Hills region and protect valuable resources, especially water, for future
generations. The Alliance is a diverse collection of citizens concerned about the
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health, environmental, and economic impacts that proposed radioactive mining
projects would have on their communities, economy, and natural resources. The
organization coordinates and facilitates the activities of grassroots groups,
primarily in their region.
Clean Water Alliance will use their mini-grant to support a follow-up
strategy meeting to the April 2, 2016, Inter Mountain West Uranium and
Water Summit: “Uranium and Water Should Not Mix”, held in Rapid City,
S.D. The follow-up meeting would be held the day after the WMAN
conference in November 2016 at the same location. Funding will pay for the
meeting room, lodging, meals, and outreach expenses to help as many
activists as possible to hold an all-day meeting to develop and commit to
specific strategy goals and build solidarity by expanding their reach and
detailing their approach to preventing, stopping, and cleaning up uranium
mines, mills, waste and nukes.
4. Clearfork Community Institute, Tennessee
The Clearfork Community Institute (CCI), founded in 1997 by local women seeking
to provide meaningful engagement for their families and community, successfully
secured the last standing coal camp school in the area and restored it into a placebased,
living, learning center that today is the Clearfork Community Institute. The
main goal of the CCI is to support coalfield residents in bringing themselves out of
poverty, away from mono-industrial practices and into a flourishing state of well
being with one another and the earth.
Funding will strengthen CCI’s Citizen’s Water Monitoring and
Enforcement Project, which provides access to equipment, training and
professional support for local water monitoring and enforcement. This
program works in partnership with the Appalachian Community
Enforcement Project, which provides a website for public and agency review
of monitoring data. Funding will result in 20 new water monitoring
volunteers and will strengthen enforcement work, help prevent future
stream degradation, contribute to the restoration of watersheds, and
provide leverage to create state-level legal precedent and thorough data and
testimonials for federal and state level comment periods and rule changes.
5. Coalition pour que le Québec ait meilleure mine, Quebec
Coalition pour que le Québec ait Meilleure Mine is a non-profit organization with
the mission to reform the Province of Quebec’s mining sector to ensure greater
environmental, social, cultural, and health protection of affected individuals and
communities. The Coalition encompasses thirty member organizations, primarily
citizen groups, environmental organizations, workers’ unions, and physician
associations. It the only organization dedicated exclusively to monitoring the
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mining sector in Quebec, and has made several significant gains including a
reform of the Quebec Mines Act.
Mini-grant funding will be used to develop campaign materials to
pressure the Quebec government to legislate a ban on uranium mining.
Work will include a ‘sign-on’ letter addressed to Quebec’s Legislature, a
press-conference or significant public action with grassroots and
indigenous organizations urging the Quebec government to ban uranium
mining, and other coordinated media and public relations work.
6. Eyak Preservation Council, Alaska
The Eyak Preservation Council (EPC) utilizes research, education, and grassroots
organizing to protect and preserve Indigenous fishing culture, wild salmon habitat
and the sustainable food system and economy of the Copper River Delta, Prince
William Sound (PWS) and Gulf of Alaska. EPC develops and advocates for public
policies and legal strategies that prevent and reduce toxic pollution, destructive
resource development (mining) and environmental degradation of salmon habitat.
The organization employs Indigenous knowledge and standing to educate and
inspire action in community members, policymakers, local stakeholders, and the
broader public.
The Eyak Preservation Council will use their mini-grant for continued
outreach, advocacy, and communications support to conduct a public and
high-donor fundraising campaign with the critical objective of raising $3 to
$5M in private funds for the purchase of the Bering River coal patents in
order to return them to the Chugach National Forest in Alaska. This will
result in transferring the 12,000-acre Bering Coalfield title from the Korean
Alaska Development Corporation (KADCO) to the U.S. Forest Service so it
will never be mined. Specifically, funding will be used for booklet printing
costs, media production, travel and meetings, direct mailers, and press
packets.
7. Fair Mining Collaborative, British Columbia
Founded in 2000, the Fair Mining Collaborative (FMC) provides values based,
credible technical and strategic guidance to communities, First Nation Leadership
groups, and political decision makers to build capacity to make informed land-use
decisions that foster healthy sustainable communities and ecosystems. FMC
partners with their clients to build knowledge of mining impacts and benefits so
they can fully participate in fair land-use decision making processes that affect
their future.
Fair Mining Collaborative will use their mini-grant to increase public knowledge of
environmental risks from and inadequate regulation of BC placer mines through
the distribution of their report titled “Stirring up the Sentiment: An Overview of
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Placer Mining in BC.” They plan to print, distribute and present the findings in
this report to First Nation Women Advocating Responsible Mining (FNWARM),
the First Nations Energy and Mining Council (FNEMC) and at the WMAN
conference.
8. Gifford Pinchot Task Force, Oregon
The mission of Gifford Pinchot Task Force (Task Force) is to protect and sustain the
forests, streams, wildlife, and communities in the heart of the Cascades through
conservation, education, and advocacy. Accomplishments include: preventing
logging of all ancient forests and inventoried roadless areas in the GPNF since 1999,
preventing major hydropower projects in sensitive watersheds and securing the
removal of Hemlock Dam in 2009 and the Condit Dam in 2011, and defeating
proposals to conduct hard rock mining exploration and development adjacent to
Mount St. Helens for the last decade.
Gifford Pinchot Task Force will use their mini-grant to continue their
campaign to protect Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument and
the Green River Valley from hard rock mining exploration and
development, including a renewed proposal by Ascot Resources Limited to
conduct exploratory drilling for copper, gold, and molybdenum.
Specifically, funding will be used for legal support and filing fees, online and
print materials developed for grassroots action and media outreach, and
travel and meeting expenses associated with educating coalition
partners, the public, and influential decision-makers and agencies.
9. Idaho Conservation League, Idaho
The Idaho Conservation League (ICL) was founded in 1973 and “protects the air
you breathe, the water you drink, and the land you love.” The largest state-based
conservation organization in a politically conservative state, ICL has a remarkably
successful track record, using scientific, policy, legal and community organizing
skills to protect the environment and Idahoans from the harmful effects of poorly
implemented mining projects.
ICL will use their mini-grant to conduct a suction dredge-monitoring
project to document unpermitted and illegal mining occurring in the South
Fork Clearwater River in north-central Idaho. Working with Advocates for
the West, they will work to build Clean Water Act enforcement cases by
collecting specific information associated with illegal mining activity.
Funding will be used to hire an investigator, and a portion of the grant
funds will support outreach to Idaho’s indigenous communities, specifically
the Shoshone-Bannock and Nez Perce Tribes.
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10. Information Network for Responsible Mining (INFORM), Colorado
Founded in 2001, the mission of the Information Network for Responsible Mining
(INFORM) is to educate the public about environmental dangers caused by
irresponsible mining practices. INFORM monitors the impacts and activities of the
hardrock mining industry in Colorado and works to protect communities, wildlife
and public lands by: 1) addressing mine proposals and permitting; 2) advocating
for regulatory and legislative reforms; and 3) disseminating information and
research to affected people and groups.
INFORM will use their funding to hire a technical consultant to respond to
the emergence of a new, experimental form of uranium processing called
impact ablation, which the industry wants exempt from specific regulations
even though it will create two new types of radioactive waste streams.
Expert consulting will assist INFORM’s coalition of groups in advocating for
the strongest and most protective licensing regulations during a public
review process to take input on whether and how ablation should be
regulated.
11. Lynn Canal Conservation, Alaska
Founded in 1972, Lynn Canal Conservation (LCC) promotes the integrity of wild
lands, protects quality of life, and fosters environmental awareness in northern
Southeast Alaska’s Lynn Canal, and Chilkat/Chilkoot watersheds near Haines. LCC
has been working hard to prevent or minimize the damaging development of a
copper/zinc/gold/silver mine located upstream of productive salmon habitat, the
village of Klukwan, and the Alaska Chilkat Bald Eagle Preserve.
Lynn Canal Conservation will use mini-grant funding to continue their
work with the Chilkat Indian Village (CIV) and Takshanuk Watershed
Council (TWC) to strategically address exploration expansion at the 6765-
acre hard rock mining claim located upstream from the CIV at Klukwan.
LCC will use grant monies to bring trainers from Trout Unlimited and
Salmon Beyond Borders to facilitate media campaign development and
strategies; develop a media, messaging, and education campaign; create
informative newspaper ads; and identify limitations and weaknesses in the
State permitting process.
12. McKinley Community PLACE MATTERS, New Mexico
The McKinley Community PLACE MATTERS initiative began in June 2013 with a
vision of all people of McKinley County living in a safe, healthy, and prosperous
environment that honors health-in-all policies and leaves a legacy of responsible
leadership grounded in equity. The organization is focused on raising awareness
about the health impacts of uranium mining along with supporting the Red Water
Pond Road Community Association with their efforts in seeking justice regarding
the uranium legacy. The Red Water Pond Road Community Association officially
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formed in 2007, and is a grassroots organization of Diné families who have
experienced and lived with the impacts of uranium mining and milling in the
Church Rock mining area since the 1960s.
Funding will be used to support the Red Water Pond Road Community
Association’s efforts in completing their community hogan, which will be
used to heal individuals and community members from the impacts of
uranium mining. This hogan will also serve as a community educational
meeting place for raising awareness about the organization’s health impact
assessment and for planning the next steps in the reuse of their land.
13. Native Youth Movement, British Columbia
Native Youth Movement was founded in 1990 in Annishinabe Territory (Winnipeg,
Manitoba). Originally organized as an alternative to gang violence, the group
expanded to a network of native youth throughout Canada and the US. Over the
years, Native Youth Movement has organized walks, runs, gatherings, community
events, protests, educational workshops, forums, and youth camps; built
traditional homes and harvesting camps; started a school program-Raising
Leaders; and published several magazines.
The mini-grant received by Native Youth Movement will provide funds to
cover the cost of printing a full color magazine that will be distributed to
indigenous communities throughout Canada and the U.S. The publication,
which has already been created, will educate indigenous youth about
mining and its impacts to indigenous lands and waters, and will highlight
community resistance to mining through printed imagery and words of
indigenous communities and people.
14. Northeastern Minnesotans for Wilderness, Minnesota
Northeastern Minnesotans for Wilderness (NMW) was founded by local citizens
from wilderness-edge communities that would be seriously harmed by proposed
sulfide-ore copper mining projects near the Boundary Waters Wilderness. NMW
has worked to achieve legal protection for the Boundary Waters Wilderness
through federal administrative action, and seeks a federal minerals withdrawal in
the Superior National Forest.
Northeastern Minnesotans for Wilderness will use mini-grant funding to
expand veterans outreach work. Their Veterans for the Boundary Waters
campaign will involve collaborative work with Vet Voice Foundation, a
national group dedicated to helping veterans gain access to public lands, in
organizing a veterans trip to the Boundary Waters Wilderness
complemented by meetings with decision makers and the news media.
Funding would cover travel, materials, and digital outreach.
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15. Patagonia Area Resource Alliance (PARA), Arizona
Patagonia Area Resource Alliance was founded in 2011 in response to renewed
interest by foreign mining companies in the Patagonia Mountains, and is a
grassroots, non-profit community alliance committed to preserving and protecting
the biological wealth of the Patagonia, Arizona area, including the uniquely
diverse Patagonia Mountains. As a citizen watchdog organization, PARA monitors
the activities of mining companies and ensures government agencies’ due
diligence, to make sure their actions have long-term, sustainable benefits to public
lands, water, wildlife, and the town of Patagonia.
Patagonia Area Resource Alliance will use their mini-grant to support a
wildlife monitoring specialist in documenting the biodiversity of the
Patagonia Mountains, whose groundwater, surface water, and air quality –
all critical to the survival of numerous threatened and endangered species –
are currently under siege by four proposed mineral extraction and
exploration proposals and one active exploration campaign by Arizona
Mining Inc. (AMI). Funding will cover game cameras, computer
equipment, and a portion of the consultant’s time.
16. Rivershed Society of BC, British Columbia
Since its inception in 1996, the Rivershed Society of BC (RSBC) has been actively
delivering public education programs, community initiatives, and building
stewardship capacity in the Fraser River Basin. The RSBC is a non-profit
organization dedicated to improving the health of the Fraser River. Its mission is
to conserve, protect and restore the health of BC riversheds in this generation.
Funding will be used by the Rivershed Society of BC to outline a strategic
plan for the protection of the Fraser River corridor between Williams Lake
and Lillooet from impacts of mines (eg: Mount Polley Mine). The Fraser
canyon corridor is home to critical salmon habitat, California big horn sheep
habitat and important ungulate winter range, as well as BC’s most
endangered ecosystem, the unique and rare Montane grasslands. Work will
include mapping land ownership, identifying collaborators, and highlighting
the benefits of protection for all stakeholders. Funding will cover a
community gathering with the Xat’sull First Nation, the drafting of a plan by a
consultant, and advertising/promotion.
17. Takshanuk Watershed Council, Alaska
Takshanuk Watershed Council provides stewardship for the Chilkat, Chilkoot and
Ferebee River systems. Through restoration, education, research, and community
involvement they work to benefit the natural ecology, economy and quality of life
valued by all residents. Takshanuk Watershed Council was formally incorporated
in 2003 via the Community Watershed Project, a cooperative agreement with the
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Alaska Department of Fish and Game, to administer Southeast Sustainable Salmon
Funds and to help establish community-based watershed councils.
Takshanuk Watershed Council (TWC), in partnership with Chilkat Indian
Village (CIV) and Lynn Canal Conservation (LCC) will use their mini-grant
to implement two primary activities identified during their 2016 Advocacy
Planning session focused on addressing the concerns related to large scale
mineral exploration and mining in the Chilkat Valley, Haines, Alaska. These
two primary activities include: (1) develop a media message and education
campaign for the Chilkat Valley Working Group including the production
of a 1-2 minute Chilkat Valley promotional video, and (2) to host a speaker
series on community involvement with mineral exploration and mining
activities with the Chilkat Valley Working Group. Funding will cover video
production costs, travel, advertising, and presenter fees.
18. WaterLegacy, Minnesota
WaterLegacy is a grassroots organization founded in 2009 by citizens concerned
that sulfide mining proposed for Northeastern Minnesota would destroy wetlands
and wild rice, contaminate water with toxic metals, increase mercury in fish, and
impair human health and tribal rights. WaterLegacy works with environmental
allies to advocate and engage citizens to oppose the PolyMet sulfide mine. In 2015,
WaterLegacy’s Advocacy Director published the only legal scholarship on tribal
authority under the Clean Water Act to object to federal permits that violate
downstream tribal water quality standards.
WaterLegacy will use funding to support their Clean Water Act Authority
project to secure tribal exercise of Clean Water Act authority prior to
consideration of permits for Minnesota’s first proposed sulfide mine, the
PolyMet copper-nickel mine project. Specifically, they will work to ensure
that the EPA develops procedures to allow the downstream Fond du Lac
Band to object to Minnesota’s first proposed sulfide mine, the PolyMet
project, and enacts rules allowing tribes to limit upstream mining pollution
impairing reservation waters, including Minnesota’s St. Louis River, where
sulfate pollution has affected mercury contamination of fish. Funding will
cover advocacy, scientific consultation and outreach to EPA.
19. Western Colorado Congress, Colorado
Western Colorado Congress (WCC) is a grassroots citizen action organization
operating in the conservative heartland of Colorado’s Western Slope. They
organize people to increase their collective power and build their skills,
empowering them to create healthy, sustainable communities, social and
economic justice, environmental stewardship and a truly democratic society. WCC
formed in 1980 as an alliance of environmental organizations and local
governments in western Colorado. By the mid-1980s, it had evolved into its present
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form, consisting of several semi-autonomous community groups under the
leadership of a central 501c3 with professional staff.
Western Colorado Congress will use their mini-grant to lay the groundwork
for transitioning Western Colorado’s economy away from dependence on
coal production and toward a prosperous, sustainable future based on clean
energy. They will do this through community-based conversations in at
least six different communities to encompass all willing stakeholders,
including elected officials, coal miners, oil and gas workers, faith
communities, low-income communities, farmers and ranchers, renewable
energy industry reps, economic development groups, water users, and
recreational groups. Visioning processes will then be used to begin to draft
transition plans for each county, and a regional comprehensive plan.
Funding will support public organizing efforts including meetings, website
and social media outreach, and list-building.
20. Uranium Watch, Utah
Uranium Watch (UW) was established in 2006 to address the health, safety, and
environmental issues associated with uranium mining and milling—the front end
of the nuclear fuel cycle. UW works to educate and advocate for protection of
public health and the environment from past, current, and future impacts of
uranium mining and uranium recovery. UW is a citizen information, research,
networking, and environmental action project. The long-term goal is to reduce or
eliminate the adverse impacts of uranium mining and milling and any other
nearby nuclear fuel cycle facilities, including the proposed nuclear reactor (Blue
Castle Project) at Green River, Utah.
Funding will be used to support a Uranium Mine Radiological Assessment
Project to examine the surface radiological conditions at uranium mines in
Utah, including permitted mines and selected abandoned and reclaimed
mines. The study will measure and compare the amount of surface activity
uranium and its progeny and ore dust materials in air at the uranium mines
to analyze the environmental impact of different above-ground storage
techniques. The findings will provide a basis for changes in BLM and USFS
regulations and individual uranium mine Plans of Operation and
environmental analyses, and will have a positive impact on all existing
and proposed uranium mining operations, not just in Utah.
21. White Mesa Concerned Community, Utah
White Mesa Concerned Community was formed ten years ago by Ute Mountain
Ute tribal members from the White Mesa Ute Community, which is located in
southern Utah and is immediately adjacent to the White Mesa uranium mill, the
only active mill in the US. Their mission is to protect the health, environment and
sacred sites of their people, with a focus on closing the White Mesa uranium mill
10
and getting the contamination cleaned up. In addition to working to close the
uranium mill, their goals are to escalate efforts within their community, tribal
government and environmental justice allies to prevent expansion of the mill and
challenge current permit violations regarding radioactive emissions.
Mini-grant funding will provide resources to enable the White Mesa
Concerned Community to educate, organize and mobilize their tribal
members and leaders in the escalating campaign to close the White Mesa
uranium mill and dump. Specifically, funding will be used to print
educational fact sheets and to organize two community meetings and
events. One event is earmarked for tribal members, and the other for
nearby residents to view a new film produced about the White Mesa Mill
contamination. Funds also will be used for travel to events and to meetings
with tribal council and government officials.

Mini Grant Recipents - February 2015
  1. Alliance for Appalachia, Kentucky

The Alliance for Appalachia was formed in 2006 to respond to the growing

momentum and urgency to end mountaintop removal coal mining and to

support a sustainable and just economy in Appalachia. The organization offers

trainings and collaborative opportunities to strengthen relationships and shared

work across states. It has developed a regional community-led watermonitoring

project and supports efforts of mountain residents to advocate for

their communities in through lobbying and meetings.

The Alliance for Appalachia will use mini-grant funding to continue their

“Our Water, Our Future” campaign. Funding will provide scholarships

for low-income Appalachian leaders to participate in Steering Meetings, in

which Our Water, Our Future strategy is developed. These meetings also will

provide opportunities for Appalachian leaders to build mechanisms of

support and shared analysis across organizations, campaigns, and state- lines.

  1. Castle Mountain Coalition, Alaska

Castle Mountain Coalition (CMC) was founded in 2006 in response to the threat

of large-scale coal development in the Matanuska Valley. Their mission is to

protect the ecological integrity, economic sustainability, and quality of life within

the Matanuska River watershed. CMC succeeded in stopping the coal project

that was the impetus for their founding, but recent shifts in the market for coal

are driving increasing interest in Matanuska Valley coal reserves. Currently CMC

represents the grassroots in a broad coalition of local, statewide, and national

organizations working together as the Mat Valley Coalition to oppose coal

development.

Castle Mountain Coalition will use mini-grant funding for their

MineWatch program. Citizens will be placed on and in close proximity to the

boundary lines of proposed mines in order to monitor the activities of the

mining corporations and to facilitate citizen engagement in the regulatory

process. Ongoing trainings will be used to develop and empower local

community experts, engage new volunteers, and hold mining corporations

accountable to the law.

  1. Chief Joseph Custer Reserve, Saskatchewan

Chief Joseph Custer Reserve encompasses the communities under the Prince

Albert Grand Council, which are: Fond du Lac Denesuline First Nation, Black

Lake Denesuline First Nation & Hatchet Lake Denesuline First Nation. The

Prince Albert Grand Council’s 12 Chiefs represent First Nation Members and

seek to protect their livelihoods, traditional territories and inherent right to the

practices of hunting and gathering. They are addressing the risk of uranium

mining to traditional practices and the potential for long-term effects to the

environment and the wildlife and plants that their elders and members rely on.

Grant money will be used to pay for elders, chiefs, and community

members to attend the World Uranium Symposium in Quebec and share

their stories of how uranium mining has affected them, and the way in

which their voices are often unheard by the fiduciary bodies who govern

the exploration of uranium mining and the issuance of operating licenses.

.

  1. Coal River Mountain Watch, West Virginia

Coal River Mountain Watch was formed in 1998 by citizens concerned about

mountaintop removal coal mining (MTR). Their mission is to stop the

destruction of their communities and environment by mountaintop removal

mining, to improve the quality of life, and to help rebuild sustainable

communities. Their projects include the Citizens’ Enforcement Program to

compel regulatory compliance where state officials fail, the Sustainable Energy

and Economic Diversification Project to promote wise energy policy and protect

landowners from unscrupulous extractive industries, the Road Show to tell their

story to a broad audience; the Tadpole Project, to clean up the Coal River, and the

Appalachian Community Health Emergency campaign to seek federal

intervention in their communities’ health crisis.

Coal River Mountain Watch will use funding to alert area residents,

through door-to-door contact, of the new, as yet unofficial mountaintop

removal coal mining permits being proposed in their community; to

organize resistance; and to provide assistance in fighting the permits, which

would encompass approximately 2,000 acres. They also will participate in

the “No More MTR Permits Day” event at the WV Dept. of Environmental

Protection.

  1. Committee for Future Generations, Saskatchewan

Committee for Future Generations was founded in 2011 to address a proposed

high-level nuclear waste dump in northern Saskatchewan, along with the supply

of uranium, much of which is coming from indigenous territory in Saskatchewan

and impacting communities socially, culturally, spiritually, physically and

economically. The organization has conducted research, participated as

interveners in the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission Hearings, educated the

public in Saskatchewan, and received Environmental Activists Awards from

Saskatchewan Eco-networks and Council of Canadians.

Committee for Future Generations will use its mini-grant to network with

other regions targeted by the uranium and nuclear waste industries,

communicate using on-line tools, and conduct teach-ins. Funding will help

cover the costs of travel, supplies, and communications.

  1. Concerned Citizens for Haines Township, Pennsylvania

Concerned Citizens for Haines Township (CCHT) is a local grassroots association

formed in January 2014 by leaders of other environmental protection groups

active in the region since 1991. The mission of CCHT, generally, is to preserve

what’s good in Haines Township and to work for positive change. Current

leading projects are to monitor and mitigate impacts of expanded open pit

limestone mining on nearby homes and businesses in two watersheds classified

(in Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection [PA-DEP]categorization) as Exceptional Value water sources.

CCHT will use emergency grant funding to pay for expert technical

analysis of a proposed design change in the Con-Stone Aaronsburg

limestone mine’s plan for protecting water sources and supply near its

expanded operation site.

  1. Dakota Rural Action, South Dakota

Dakota Rural Action (DRA) is a grassroots family agriculture and conservation

group formed in 1987 to respond to the devastation wrought by the 1980’s farm

crisis. DRA organizes South Dakotans to protect family farmers and ranchers,

natural resources, and a unique way of life. The organization has responded to

issues including agricultural credit and policy; sustainable agriculture: local food,

oil and gas regulation; renewable energy; confined animal feeding operations;

property rights and responsibilities; and uranium development in the Black

Hills.

Mini grant funds will be used to do a large direct mailing, produce

outreach materials, and help fund a billboard as part of the campaign to stop

uranium mining in the Black Hills. Specifically, DRA is seeking funds to

increase its capacity in opposing the efforts by Arzaga to receive a permit to

build the first in situ leach mining permit in South Dakota.

  1. Deer Trail Press, Wisconsin

Deer Tail Press was founded in 2006 to serve as the agent for the publication of

the book, The Buzzards Have Landed! – The Real Story of the Flambeau Mine.

The book, gifted to schools, libraries and tribal governments across the region

(and available as a free download), chronicles the grassroots resistance

movement to the mine and exposes various mining company maneuvers

designed to squelch opposition. It also includes a detailed analysis of mining

regulations impacting the Flambeau project and how ground and surface water

quality fared under those regulations, giving others ammunition to use

whenever the Flambeau Mine is featured by industry representatives as a “model

mine.”

Deer Trail Press will use funding to help cover printing and mailing costs

for a brochure entitled: The Sad Story of the Flambeau Project, developed with

the assistance of mining engineer Jack Parker. It will be provided to U.S.

and Wisconsin government officials, regulators within Wisconsin DNR, tribal

government officials, and other interested parties. It is meant to pressure

Wisconsin DNR to establish monitoring to define the extent of groundwater

pollution from the backfilled mine pit, and to draw attention to false

statements about the environmental performance of the Flambeau Mine

propagated by industry representatives in their bid to develop new mines in

Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Michigan.

  1. 9. Kanawha Forest Coalition, West Virginia

The Kanawha Forest Coalition, formed in 2013, is a coalition of local residents

and organizations working to stop a recently permitted mountaintop removal

coal mine located just outside Charleston, WV city limits and adjacent to the

10,000-acre Kanawha State Forest. Their goals are to stop the mine, use their

campaign to raise awareness about the broad range of adverse impacts that

Mountain Top Removal (MTR) surface mining has on Appalachian communities,

and engage in a community-based MTR resistance campaign.

Kanawha Forest Coalition will use their funding to organize volunteers in

an ongoing effort to stop the mine. Activities will include outreach,

educational, and media efforts that encompass events, demonstrations, and

the political organization of impacted communities.

  1. Keepers of the Athabasca Watershed, Alberta

Keepers of the Athabasca Watershed Society, founded in 2006, is composed of

First Nations, Metis, Inuit, environmental groups, and citizens working together

to secure and protect water and watershed lands for ecological, social, cultural

and community health and well-being in the Athabasca River Watershed. They

are part of a larger coalition of Arctic Basin watershed stewardship groups,

Keepers of the Water Council. Their activities are based on the 2006 DehCho

Elders’ Keepers of the Water Declaration and Principles that clean water is a

human right and that water is sacred.

Funding will be used to continue independent sediment monitoring for

priority metals and organic contaminants in the Athabasca River downstream

of the October 31, 2013 Obed coal mine slurry spill to document possible

changes in levels of contaminants as a result of the spill. A consultant will

help analyze multi-year sampling data. This activity is part of a larger Keepers

project to increase capacity to monitor both water and sediments affected

by industrial releases as part of ongoing advocacy work in the Athabasca

River Basin.

  1. Land and Community: Responses to Resource Extraction, Saskatchewan

Land and Community is a planning committee for a two day workshop titled

“Land and Community: Responses to Resource Extraction in Saskatchewan,” It

includes a grassroots Indigenous advisory group in charge of the format, content

and recruitment for the 2nd day of a two-day workshop meant for people affected

by resource development on Indigenous lands.

The mini-grant award will be used for a workshop in March 2015 that

brings together Indigenous land defenders, environmentalists, and landowners

to strategize about responding to Saskatchewan’s resource extraction

industries (including potash and uranium). Specifically, funding will

subsidize the travel of Indigenous peoples from the Committee for Future

Generations and the Northern Trappers Alliance (both groups currently

resisting uranium) to attend. Members from Saskatchewan First Nations

Potash Issues Panel also will receive subsidies to travel to the workshop.

  1. Lutsel K’e Dene First Nation –Wildlife, Lands, and Environment

Committee, Northwest Territories

The Wildlife Lands & Environment Committee (WLEC) of the Lutsel K’e Dene

First Nation (LKDFN) reviews, monitors, and manages wildlife issues, land and

water permits/licenses, and all environmental issues on behalf of its members.

The WLEC also works closely with the Lutsel K’e Dene First Nation in

developing guidelines and regulations for mining, mineral exploration and

hydro development.

The Lutsel K’e Dene First Nation (LKDFN) will use their funding to

participate in the Final Hearing of the environmental assessment process for the

Kiggavik mine, a proposed uranium mine on the edge of LKDFN Traditional

Territory. LKDFN opposes this project because it does not believe that the

impacts to caribou and to the traditional way of life in the community of

Lutsel K’e have been adequately assessed. The development is proposed next to

the boundary of one of the most important parts of LKDFN traditional

territory, crosses a river sacred to LKDFN, and is close to the calving grounds

of caribou herds on which the people depend for their livelihoods. Two

representatives will give a presentation and participate in

the Final Hearing.

  1. Native American Technologies (NAET), Wisconsin

Since 1995, NAET has been working to stop proposed mining in Chippewas

Ceded Territory through the Anishinaabe Niijii” (Native Friend) Alliance. Their

accomplishments include helping to stop the Crandon mine, and working to

successfully pass a Wisconsin statewide Metallic Sulfide Mining Moratorium in

  1. NAET has been actively working to raise awareness of and prevent the

mining of the Penokee Hills, the headwaters of world famous Kakagon wild rice

sloughs on the Bad River reservation and Lake Superior, directly downstream

from the proposed acid generating mine and waste dump.

NAET will use its mini-grant to further its work to stop the proposed

mine in the Penokee Hills by working with local townships and county boards

to prevent changes in zoning laws that would allow mining; organizing local

residents; raising awareness through the use of media, social media, and

traditional journalism, including recording meetings and putting them

online; and by organizing more local schools and non-native snowshoe and

walking hikes through the Penokee Hills proposed mine site to draw larger

awareness of the pristine nature of this headwaters that supplies 40% of Lake

Superior’s freshwater.

  1. Powder River Basin Resource Council, Wyoming

Powder River Basin Resource Council is a citizen-led, grassroots community

organization in Wyoming. Founded in 1973, the organization works to promote

the responsible development of Wyoming’s abundant mineral resources,

addressing the impacts of all energy issues, including coal, oil and gas, and

uranium.

Powder River Basin Resource Council will use their mini-grant funding to

retain an expert to review the proposed EPA regulations to protect groundwater

during in situ uranium mining and milling. The expert report will be

provided to participants in the WMAN uranium caucus and will be

submitted it as part of the organization’s comments on the proposed rule.

  1. Sierra Club of British Columbia Foundation, B.C.

The Sierra Club of BC Foundation exists to protect, conserve, and educate the

public about BC’s wilderness, species and ecosystems – within the urgent context

of climate change impacts. Since 1969, Sierra Club BC has been a leader in

advocating for science-based policy, supporting community initiatives and

inspiring passionate commitment to the values of environmental stewardship.

The organization has more than 25,000 supporters from diverse communities

across the province, and a network of dynamic and committed local groups.

Sierra Club BC has a track record of successful collaborations with First Nations.

Funding will be used by Sierra Club BC to launch a campaign to raise

public awareness of the ecological and cultural values of the Dasikox

(Taseko) watershed, which is situated in central B.C. interior and under

intense pressure from mining interests. The organization will work closely

with the Tsilhqot’in communities of Xeni Gwet’in and Yunesit’in, and the

Friends of Nemaiah Valley (FONV) to garner widespread and vocal public

support for the Tsilhqot’in National Government’s plan to protect the area as a

tribal park.

  1. Native Village of Tyonek-IRA Council, Alaska

The Native Village of Tyonek (NVT) – IRA Council is a federally recognized Tribe

residing along the beaches of the Cook Inlet, and 35 air miles from Anchorage.

The peoples of Tyonek have thrived off the marine environment, rivers, and

lands for thousands of years, relying on a subsistence lifestyle that is centuries

old, and tied to wild, healthy salmon. They are addressing a threat to their

traditional native way of life from plans to extract coal for transport to Asian

markets.

The Native Village of Tyonek (NVT) will use funding to bring 40-50 native

youth together to learn about their Traditional Cultural Landscape and the

Chuit’na Archeological District, and to learn about the importance of

protecting sacred sites against the threat of the largest coal mine ever

proposed in Alaska, which threatens to destroy 14 miles of healthy salmon

spawning areas, traditional moose hunting locations, and ancestral burials

grounds. By learning about the location and significance of sacred and

traditional sites, their protection and the protection of traditional subsistence

hunting and fishing places can continue to be used effectively to ward off

development of the mine.

  1. The Sierra Fund, California

The Sierra Fund founded in 2001, is dedicated to the Sierra Nevada. The Sierra

Fund mission is to increase and organize investment in protecting and restoring

the natural resources of the Sierra through advocacy, to leverage state and federal

investment in the region; philanthropy, to attract private donor investment; and

strategic campaigns, to pursue critically needed programs in the Sierra.

The Sierra Fund will use its mini-grant funding to provide scholarships

and travel stipends to individuals from underrepresented organizations or

tribes to enable them to attend Sierra Fund’s conference entitled “Reclaiming

the Sierra 2015: The New Gold Rush.” The purpose of the conference is to set

the agenda for an era of mine reclamation and community revitalization in

California’s Gold Country.

Mini Grant Recipents - June 2014

 

  1. Chilkat Indian Village, Alaska

The Chilkat Indian Village is a federally recognized tribal government.  The Constantine-Palmer Mine is a proposed copper mine within the Chilkat River Watershed. It is currently in the exploration stage.  If it is developed, it may imperil the health of the Chilkat River, and consequently the ecological, cultural, and economic health of the Chilkat Indian Village community.

 

This project will continue development of the comprehensive baseline data map (started in 2013) regarding the community’s uses and values in the Chilkat Valley in anticipation of impacts related to development of the Constantine-Palmer Mine upstream.  This information will be uploaded into a GIS data base.  The Chilkat Indian Village will then present research findings to the proposed Chilkat Valley Mining Forum and the Klukwan Community Meeting.

 

  1. Clean Water Alliance, South Dakota

The mission of the Clean Water Alliance, founded in 2009, is to prevent radioactive mining in the Black Hills region and protect valuable resources – especially water – for future generations.  The Alliance is a diverse collection of citizens concerned about the health, environmental, and economic impacts that proposed radioactive mining projects would have on communities, economy, and natural resources.  They work to coordinate and facilitate the activities of grassroots groups in their region.

 

The requested funds would help Clean Water Alliance raise awareness of Environmental Protection Agency and Bureau of Land Management actions involving a proposed in situ leach uranium mine in the Black Hills. This awareness will generate increased public comments and participation in hearings before these agencies.

 

  1. Council for Public Health in Mining Communities, Yukon Territory

The Council for Public Health in Mining Communities was founded in March 2013 to:

  • Protect and improve public health for mining-affected communities.
  • Promote responsible mining development practices.
  • Use community-based research to determine health impacts caused by mining and determine appropriate mitigation methods and advocacy to achieve improved health conditions.

 

They are currently in federal negotiations in the review of the Metal Mining Effluent Regulations under Environment Canada, a critical legislation impacting water quality and subsistence life styles in Canada. They are working in collaboration with other NGOs and First Nations to investigate methods for cumulative health impact assessments for communities at various stages of mining development.

 

The Council for Public Health in Mining Communities will use min-grant funds to improve the organization’s visibility and outreach by developing a website. The website will link to internal and external resources providing connections to documents, advice and other communities with similar concerns.

 

  1. Defenders of the Black Hills, South Dakota

Defenders of the Black Hills was founded in 2002 to preserve, restore and protect the environment of the 1868 Fort Laramie Treaty Territory.  The organization has worked to protect sacred sites, stop mining (particularly uranium) and protect wildlife in the last remaining wilderness in the Black Hills.

 

Funds will be used to pay for travel to Washington DC to attend a conference on, and lobby for, a bill to clean up the estimated 10,000 abandoned uranium mines across the country.

 

  1. Douglas Indian Association, Alaska

The Douglas Indian Association is a Douglas and Juneau-based, federally-recognized Tlingit Tribe with tribal members of both the T’aaku Kwáan and A’akw Kwáan ancestry.  Tribal members of the Douglas Indian Association include the Tleineidi, Wooshketaan, Ganaxadi (T’aaku) and Yan yeidi (T’aaku).  The T’aaku Tribes originated from Canada via the Taku River, home of the First Nation Taku River Tlingit that still today reside in Atlin, British Columbia.

 

The controversial Tulsequah Chief Mine proposal threatens the extraordinary ecological and cultural values of the transboundary Taku watershed of northwest British Columbia and southeast Alaska.  The Douglas Indian Association (DIA) hopes to raise awareness of the Taku, and support current Tlingit opposition to proposed mining, by hosting a boat excursion into the Taku, reconnecting elders with the river and helping to reunify Tlingit people through their common interest in protecting the Taku.

 

  1. Eastern Navajo Diné Against Uranium Mining (ENDAUM), New Mexico

In 1994 ENDAUM was founded by local community members from around the Crownpoint, area in northwestern New Mexico.  The group of concerned citizens had identified the mission of protecting the purity of water, air, lands and community health in areas impacted by uranium mining activities for the present and future generations.  Furthermore, ENDAUM is also currently working to protect local aquifers from contamination that could result from the In Stu Leach “ISL” mining method.

 

ENDAUM received funding to fulfill the goal of stopping further mining on and near the Navajo Nation by educating the public and elected tribal officials to keep the 2005 Navajo Nation Uranium Ban called, the Diné Natural Resources Protection Act “DNRPA”, in place by visiting ten Navajo chapters and being involved in five Navajo Nation Council standing committee meetings from now through September 2014 to defeat a current Navajo Nation Legislation that threatens the DNRPA.

 

  1. Eyak Preservation Council, Alaska

The Eyak Preservation Council (EPC) is a 501(c) 3 Native-founded grassroots environmental justice and social change organization based in Cordova, Alaska. EPC’s mission is to honor Eyak heritage and to conserve wild salmon culture and habitat through education, awareness and the promotion of sustainable lifeways for all peoples.  EPC was conceived on the day of the Exxon Valdez oil spill.

 

EPC recieved support for its campaign to retire the Bering River coalfields and return them to the Chugach National Forest to ensure that the Copper, Katalla and Bering River Watersheds are protected from the destructive effects of mountain top removal strip mining. Funds will be used to produce a GIS map of the project location and hard copy materials to assist in our regional and high donor campaign efforts that are necessary in order to complete this globally significant conservation campaign.

 

  1. Friends of the San Juans, Washington

Friends of the San Juans (FSJ) was founded in 1979 to support local efforts to manage growth and protect natural environments in San Juan County. Since then, FSJ’s activities have expanded to include: cultural restoration, marine research and habitat restoration, ecological stewardship and conservation, land use and environmental compliance, community engagement and education, and endangered species protection.

 

Grant funding will be used to engage, inform and mobilize first nations, local, state and federal governments against the risk of international shipping associated with coal and tar sands; to codify these concerns in an international tool through the designation of the Salish Sea as a Particularly Sensitive Sea Area (PSSA).  Funding will primarily be used for travel to conduct tribal outreach to solicit tribal support for the PSSA.

 

  1. Keeper of the Mountains Foundation, West Virginia

In 2004, Larry Gibson founded the Keeper of the Mountains Foundation (KotM) to educate and inspire people to work for healthier, more sustainable mountain communities and bring an end to mountaintop removal. Previous to the formation of the Keeper of the Mountains Foundation, Larry Gibson’s ancestral home and family cemetery on Kayford Mountain in West Virginia were threatened by mountaintop removal. Larry and his family protected the land by turning it into a 50 acre private land trust – Stanley Heirs Park. Currently, despite multiple offers by coal companies for the land situated on $600,000,000 of coal, Stanley Heirs Park remains a green island situated in the middle of 7,500 acres of mountaintop removal.

With grant funding, Keeper of the Mountains Foundation will work to build community power against the K-2 surface mine proposed next to the Kanawha State Forest, within half a mile of the Loudendale community, and within 3 miles of downtown Charleston, WV. KotM will support efforts through campaign material creation, legal assistance, & community outreach.

 

  1. Mary’s Igloo Traditional Council, Alaska

Mary’s Igloo is located on the northwest bank of the Kuzitrin River, on the Seward Peninsula of Alaska.  Natives of “Kauwerak,” as the village was originally called, were Inupiaq Eskimos known as Kauweramiuts.  During the gold prospecting boom, non-Natives renamed the village “Mary’s Igloo,” after an Eskimo woman named Mary, who welcomed miners, trappers, and other newcomers into her home for coffee. By 1910, Mary’s Igloo had become a large mixed community of Eskimos, white traders, miners, innkeepers, missionaries, and support crews for barges. A federally-recognized tribe is located in the community — the Native Village of Mary’s Igloo.

 

The Mary’s Igloo Traditional Council will use funding to conduct a Watershed Assessment of salmon streams in the Imuruk Basin Watershed to address the impacts of graphite mining activity on human health and subsistence resources in the watershed. The project will assist the tribe in gathering valuable data to protect water and subsistence resources from potential mining activity impacting Graphite, Ruby, Glacier Canyon, Trail, Hot Springs and Christophosen Creeks.

 

  1. McKinley Community PLACE MATTERS, New Mexico

The McKinley Community PLACE MATTERS initiative began in 2013 with a vision that all people of McKinley County will live in a safe, healthy, and prosperous environment that honors health-in-all policies and leaves a legacy of responsible leadership grounded in equity. By using a health equity lens, they work to change systems that perpetuate health disparities related to the impacts of institutional racism and multigenerational trauma, by empowering participating communities to impact equitable policy changes.

 

The goal of this project is to support the Red Water Pond Community Association (a Navajo/Dine community) in their process to heal individuals and community members from the impact of uranium mining. The purpose of this funding proposal is to raise significant awareness about the impact of uranium mining in the surrounding area by hosting the 35th anniversary uranium tailings spill commemoration event.

 

  1. Native Villages of Ambler, Kobuk and Shungnak, Alaska

The Native Villages of Ambler, Kobuk and Shungnak are situated along the Kobuk River in the Northwest Arctic Borough. These villages are predominantly Alaska Native or part Native and Eskimo, practicing a traditional subsistence lifestyle.

Grant funds will be used to organize a 3-day, 2-night river trip along the Kobuk River to teach youth and adults in the Village to collect water quality data. This trip would provide a venue for youth to learn about the ecological health of the river and our fish, as well as public participation in land use planning.  While building relationships between Native Alaskan tribes and conservation groups, the villages will have the opportunity to talk with other villagers about how to participate in public comment periods for the BLM Resource Management Plan development, which will impact the traditional fishing waters of the people on the Kobuk, especially the Pah River area.

  1. Native Youth Sexual Health Network, Ontario

The Native Youth Sexual Health Network (NYSHN) is an organization by and for Indigenous youth that works across issues of sexual and reproductive health, rights and justice throughout the United States and Canada. NYSHN uses a reproductive justice framework to address not only the issues that affect our bodies, but also their environments.

 

NYSHN will use funding for their “Violence on the Land, Violence on our Bodies: Building an Indigenous Response to Environmental Violence” community-based research and advocacy project aimed at documenting the experiences of Indigenous women, youth and community members whose safety, sexual and reproductive rights have been affected by extractive industrial practices, such as mining. This project will also document and develop legal, grassroots and international strategies to combat these impacts and industries.

 

  1. Northeastern Minnesotans for Wilderness (NMW), Minnesota

NMW was formed in 1996 to advance the views of residents of northeastern Minnesota who support protection and preservation of the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness and the Quetico-Superior ecosystem. The immediate impetus for the founding was an effort led by some officials to undo certain wilderness protections enjoyed by the Boundary Waters. In 2013, NMW leaders undertook the task of forming a national coalition to oppose multiple proposed copper-nickel mining projects in the watershed of the Boundary Waters.

 

This grant will support NMW’s campaign to achieve a ban on major copper-nickel mining in the watershed of the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness (“Boundary Waters”), which is the most heavily-used unit of the national wilderness preservation system. NMW representatives (northern Minnesota residents) will travel to Washington DC with the objective of obtaining an order of the Secretary of the Interior withdrawing federal mineral rights in the watershed from leasing.

 

  1. PRIDE” Piedmont Residents in Defense of the Environment, Virginia

“PRIDE” Piedmont Residents in Defense of the Environment ‘s mission is to preserve natural heritage, to protect public health, to safeguard the environment, to monitor issues and hold government official accountable for their actions.   The major project of PRIDE is to maintain Virginia’s moratorium on uranium mining and work to place a permanent ban on uranium in Virginia.

 

WMAM/IEN grant funding will be used in conjunction with donations from individuals and other originations to fund the KEEP THE BAN billboards on State Route highways in Virginia.

 

  1. Save Our Cabinets, Idaho

Save Our Cabinets was established in 2008 to address the proposed Montanore mine, and to advocate for the protection of Montana’s Cabinet Mountains ecosystem. Their goal is to prevent destructive activities, especially hard rock mining, which would impact the ecosystem, while fostering an appreciation of its wilderness character, native fish and wildlife, and pristine air and waters.

 

Project funding will be used to engage a fisheries consultant to work with attorneys in identifying potential legal angles for challenge.  Additionally, a water expert will review the modeling of the hydrological impacts of the proposed Montanore mine on ground and surface waters in the Cabinet Mountains Wilderness and associated tributaries in the Clark Fork Watershed, especially waters designated as Outstanding Resource Waters.

 

  1. Save the Wild U.P., Michigan

Save the Wild U.P. was formed in 2004 by a small group of concerned citizens specifically to stop the Eagle Mine project located 30 miles north of Marquette, and 10 miles upstream from Lake Superior. Save the Wild U.P. was founded with a simple mission – to protect the Upper Peninsula’s unique lakes, lands, and culture from the hazards of new mining projects.

 

Save the Wild U.P. will use WMAN-IEN mini­grant funding to continue their innovative internship program in the Fall 2014 semester, dedicated to recruiting, engaging, and empowering a new generation of leaders to fight sulfide mining as effective community advocates, participatory researchers, and grassroots organizers.

 

  1. Sheep Mountain Alliance, Colorado

Sheep Mountain Alliance (SMA) is a 26-year-old grassroots citizen organization dedicated to preserving the natural environment in the Telluride Region and southwest Colorado. They strive to protect and educate people about the regional ecosystems, wildlife habitats and watersheds. The organization was founded in 1988 when a small group of concerned citizens joined together to stop a logging project on Sheep Mountain just outside of Telluride.

 

Funds will be used to initiate a new proactive campaign to bring remediation to abandoned uranium mine sites throughout southwestern Colorado. The campaign goal is to establish relationships with key agency employees and regional stakeholders, research funding options, develop a detailed understanding of a path towards remediation and initiate action.

 

  1. Southwest Indigenous Uranium Forum, New Mexico

Southwest Indigenous Uranium Forum was established in 2009.  The Forum’s goals and objectives are to:

    • Seek funds to hire Native youth interns to help with communications, social networking, special 
projects and inter-generational organizing models
    • Continue traditional ceremonies
    • Organizing to stop uranium mining on the southwest and beyond
    • Compile data on impacts of radiation exposure
    • Strengthen capacity to provide support to indigenous communities

 

Grant funds will be used to host electronic outreach, meetings with decision-makers and innovative art workshops each focused on healing the community from the impacts of uranium mining. Funds will also be used for trainings with experts related to Navajo grasslands and other areas impacted by the legacy of uranium mining.

 

  1. Takshanuk Watershed Council, Alaska

Takshanuk Watershed Council provides stewardship for the Chilkat, Chilkoot and Ferebee River systems. Through restoration, education, research, and community involvement we work to benefit the natural ecology, economy and quality of life valued by all residents. Takshanuk Watershed Council was formally incorporated in 2003 via the Community Watershed Project, a cooperative agreement with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, to administer Southeast Sustainable Salmon Funds and to help establish community-based watershed councils.

 

Takshanuk Watershed Council (TWC), in partnership with Chilkat Indian Village and Chilkoot Indian Association will use funds to develop and host a community forum to discuss the potential positive and/or negative social and economic impacts of a 6,765 acre mine proposed within the headwaters of the Klehini River in Southeast Alaska. This forum will include presentations and community discussions with experts to help ensure that the community is appraised with a comprehensive, non-biased suite of perspectives to help guide natural resource decisions within the watershed.

 

  1. Teller Traditional Council, Alaska

The Teller Traditional Council and other Native Alaskan tribal communities located on the Seward Peninsula are concerned about impacts on water resources and other activities by mining claim holders for the Graphite One Mine. The mine is located 3 kilometers away from intertidal waters at the Imuruk Basin and located in the middle of highly productive aquatic habitat upon which the local Native Alaskan communities, including the Native Village of Teller, Mary’s Igloo, Brevig Mission depend for a significant portion of their subsistence uses.

 

Grant funds will be used by the Teller Traditional Council, working in collaboration with Mary’s Igloo Traditional Council, for the Imuruk Basin Subsistance Resource Protection Project, to monitor, comment on and appeal federal and state agency actions related to graphite mining activity in the Basin.

 

  1. Uranium Watch, Utah

Uranium Watch (UW), was established in 2006 to address the health, safety, and environmental issues associated with uranium mining and milling—the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle. UW works to educate and advocate for protection of public health and the environment from past, current, and future impacts of uranium mining and uranium recovery. UW is a citizen information, research, networking, and environmental action project. The long-term goal is to reduce or eliminate the adverse impacts of uranium mining and milling and any other nearby nuclear fuel cycle facilities.

 

UW will use grant funding on a campaign to educate community and regulatory agencies regarding uranium mining and milling, abandoned uranium mines, and “zombie” uranium mines in the Utah and 4-Corners area.  The project includes 1) commenting and participating in hearings; 2) public presentations regarding uranium mines in Utah; 3) attendance at Abandoned Uranium Mine (AUM) workshop; 4) organize AUM workshops; 5) meeting with state and federal mine and mill regulators; 6) field trips to uranium mines, including abandoned mines; and 7) developing reports and presentations.

 

  1. WaterWealth Project, British Columbia

The WaterWealth Project started in early 2013 with a goal of providing local control over decisions that affect water, with true acknowledgement of Indigenous Rights and Title and the physical, spiritual, cultural and ecological values of water.  Activities to date include engagement in water policy at both the political and community-engagement level, and work with public opinion experts as well as with other local, regional and national water organizations.

 

WaterWealth Project will use grant funds to engage an Aboriginal Community Consultant to undertake a study of in-river gravel mining in the Fraser Valley.  The project will partner with  the Centre for Indigenous Environmental Resources and the Ts’elxweyeqw Tribe to take advantage of new governance provisions within the BC Water Sustainability Act, specifically an Indigenous-led Water Sustainability Plan for the Ts’elxweyeqw traditional territory.

 

Mini Grant Recipents - February 2014
  1. Aligning for Responsible Mining, SD

Aligning for Responsible Mining (ARM) is an Oglala Sioux Tribe nonprofit unincorporated association formed on June 25, 2007 to: (a) cause the International Precautionary Principle[1] to be applied to all mining activities, (b) train people in the technical aspects of testing, monitoring and reporting of the impacts of mining activities, and (c) prevent abusive mining (that which does not show it can be done without causing irreversible harm to the water, environment, food supply and will not cause any substantial adverse health impacts to populations of people, animals, fish, birds, plants and other wildlife.

 

ARM will use grant funds in its ongoing opposition to uranium mining in the Black Hills and in traditional Lakota territory which adversely affect the Oglala Aquifer, and related aquifers.  Funding will pay for expert witness services in the Crow Butte North Trend Expansion, Crow Butte Renewal, and Powertech-Dewey Burdock projects.

 

  1. California Indian Environmental Alliance, CA

California Indian Environmental Alliance (CIEA) was founded in 2006 to address mining toxins threatening physical and environmental health, and the cultural continuance of California Peoples and families. CIEA’s core programs are the Mercury Tribal Health, Tribal Self-Advocacy, and our Leadership programs. Together these empower California Indian communities to practice subsistence fishing cultures, avoid mercury and PCBs in fish, self-advocate for cleanup of California lands and waterways left over from legacy gold mining, and train the future generation to be environmental stewards.

 

With grant funding, CIEA will survey California Tribal staff and Tribal Members about the regional water bodies they fish most frequently and those with spiritual connection. Following data gathering and analysis, they will compare the information, about the sites of most concern, with the Surface Water Ambient Monitoring Program and its Bioaccumulation Oversight Group (BOG/SWAMP) database and existing studies to determine which of those locations are potentially lowest in mercury and/or other toxins and meet the cultural needs of the Tribe. CIEA staff will work with Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) and Karuk staff to issue “safer” fish consumption advisories and then distribute this information to California Indigenous Peoples and families in the region.

  1. Carrier Sekani Tribal Council, BC

Carrier Sekani Tribal Council (CSTC) provides political and technical support to eight First Nations who belong to the CSTC association.  The combined population of CSTC’s member First Nations is over 10,000 people.  The combined territories of the CSTC member First Nations is approximately 78,700 sq. km (7.87 million hectares).  The member First Nations of the CSTC are: Burns Lake Band (Ts’il Kaz Koh First Nation), Nak’azdli Band, Nadleh Whut’en, Saik’uz First Nation, Stellat’en First Nation, Takla Lake First Nation, Tl’azt’en Nation, and Wet’suwet’en First Nation.

 

CSTC applied for funding for a project focused on preparing communication materials (2 brochures) for public distribution related to the impacts of mining within the CSTC territory.  The WMAN/IEN grant will be used to cover the cost of a consultant to design, create and vet for accuracy the brochure.  The CSTC will cover costs related to printing, web posting and mapping related to the project.

 

  1. Clearfork Community Institute, TN

Clearfork Community Institute(CCI) is a community-led education and community development center that seeks to establish and exercise community-led development that supports and sustains Central Appalachia by facilitating and prioritizing knowledge gained through work and reflection in place-based community. In 1997, two acres and a school in Eagan, TN were acquired and the property was then secured by the Woodland Community Land Trust. The 6,000-square-foot coal camp school was transformed into the Clearfork Community Institute.

 

 Funding will be used for an outreach campaign to increase the number of visitors and participants, including youth, students, the elderly, unemployed and those struggling with addiction.  CCI will print brochures, build a website and train staff in outreach.  Funds will also cover website management and the purchase of a camera.

 

  1. Concerned Citizens & Retired Miners Coalition, AZ

Concerned Citizens and Retired Miners Coalition is a grassroots group of citizens who:  1) reside in Superior, AZ or do not reside in Superior, AZ but are affiliated with relatives who are residents; 2) are retired hard-rock miners who previously worked in the now non-operational mine in Superior, AZ and were displaced due to mine closure or personal disability; or 3) are individuals who are concerned that important U.S. public recreational land will be conveyed to a foreign mining company for private use.

 

Funding will be used to continue outreach and education, sharing and advising the residents/citizens of the AZ copper mining region and surrounding communities, of the negative environmental impacts and destructive nature of the proposed Resolution Copper Mine (RCM) located near to Superior, AZ.  Specificially, CCRMC will produce informational copies, banners, bumper stickers, travel and marketing/advertising for on-going public meetings and forums, and cover travel costs to strategic meetings.

 

  1. Concerned Citizens of Haines Township, PA

Concerned Citizens of Haines Township (CCHT) is a new association of residents in Haines and neighboring municipalities in the Upper Penns Creek watershed.  Led by 3 longstanding coalition participants, CCHT addresses a particular piece in the puzzle of reducing the mine’s impacts on community life.

 

CCHT applied for funding to further their project to prevent the permanent closing of a historic public road.  Elected township officials have agreed to close the road to facilitate mining.  Grant funds will support legal representation, expert testimony and a traffic study for preventing the road closure.

 

 

  1. Couchiching First Nation, Ontario

Couchiching First Nation, an Anishinaabe tribe, is located in Northwestern Ontario on the Minnesota border, also home to a number of junior mines.  The community is considered to be a “Aboriginal First Nation” as defined by the Canadian government and is a recognized member of Treaty #3.

 

The Couchiching are  currently assessing the potential impact of three mine start-up proposals in the region.  Funding will be used to convene elders and consultants on environmental impacts of mines to develop a strategy for addressing proposals.  Local governments and mining company representatives will be invited to participate.  Grant funds will cover travel and consultant costs.

 

  1. Council for Responsible Mining, SD

The Council for Responsible Mining (CRM) is a community group formed in 2008 in the Black Hills fighting uranium and rare earth metals mining, with advertising/education to the public on the dangers of such, and to fund good science on the toxins generated by this mining. They are composed of volunteer scientists, lawyers, teachers and community activists. CRM recently set up a Public Action Committee, or “super PAC”, to fund science in water testing.

 

Funding will be used to pay lab fees to map the chemical and biochemical outcomes of the chemical products of alkaline lixivients and rock stratas in INSITU uranium mining, to see if these chemicals show up in adjacent drinking water wells, research toxicology of these, and correlate them with health compromises of people and communities living adjacent to active INSITU uranium mines, with the finding of these products in their drinking water wells.

 

  1. Dakota Rural Action, SD

Dakota Rural Action (DRA) was formed in 1987 to respond to the devastation wrought by the 1980’s farm crisis on farmers, ranchers, and rural main street businesses in South Dakota.  DRA’s mission is:  Dakota Rural Action is a grassroots family agriculture and conservation group that organizes South Dakotans to protect our family farmers and ranchers, natural resources and unique way of life.

 

The grant funds will be used for strategic planning, including to update the chapter’s campaign and membership.  Dakota Rural Action is a member organization of the Western Organization of Resource Councils and will access campaign planning, message development, leadership development and power analysis tools.  These funds will help pay for the Dakota Rural Action staff time needed to use these tools and develop a comprehensive campaign.

 

 

  1. Keepers of the Athabasca Watershed Society, Alberta

Keepers of the Athabasca Watershed Society, founded in 2006, and incorporated as a not-for-profit society in the Province of Alberta in 2008, is composed of First Nations, Metis, Inuit, environmental groups, and Watershed citizens working together for the protection of water, land and air, and thus for all living things today and tomorrow in the Athabasca River Watershed.  Their mission is to unite the peoples of the Athabasca River and Lake Watershed to secure and protect water and watershed lands for ecological, social, cultural and community health and well- being.

 

Project funding will pay for expertise and lab time to conduct independent sediment monitoring for priority metals and organic contaminants in the Athabasca River downstream of the October 1, 2013 Obed coal mine slurry spill, considered the second largest slurry spill ever in North America. This activity is part of a larger project to train a group of Keepers members to monitor both water and sediments affected by industrial releases as part of ongoing advocacy work in the Athabasca River Basin.

 

  1. KIISHIK Community Association, Ontario

KIISHIK Community Association is based in Lac Seul FN and Red Lake, Ontario. It was initially created 20 years ago to assist teachers in local schools to bring Indigenous people into classrooms to teach their history, culture, values, practices, art to develop healthier cross-cultural relationships. In more recent years, the focus has been on Anishnabe cultural education, and training Anishnabe youth in traditional values and skills, as well as local land protection activities and building relationships with concerned allies in non-Indigenous communities.

 

KIISHIK will use funding to hold a 3-5 day gathering for local Indigenous people and allies, in May 2014 at Big Falls on Namekosipiiw Anishnabe Territory, near Red Lake, Ontario. The purpose of the gathering is to engage in education and organizing around environmental and health impacts from a mine at Red Lake (specifically the new hydro dam scheduled for construction at Big Falls), as well as local Anishnabe culture. The focus will include history of the territory, traditional land use practices, treaty and Indigenous rights and cultural issues, including the protection of historic migratory canoe routes.  Funding will cover speaker fees and travel.

 

  1. Local Environmental Action Demanded, OK

LEAD Agency, (Local Environmental Action Demanded) is a 501(c) 3 organization of citizens founded in 1997 to deal with the multiple environmental issues in Northeast Oklahoma: the Tar Creek Superfund Site, air quality, solid waste, and water quality. Their mission is “Leading the way for Environmental Justice in Northeast Oklahoma”.

Purposes:

  • To educate the community on environmental concerns in Northeast Oklahoma
  • To take actions to counter environmental hazards that put Northeast Oklahoma’s residents at risk, financially and physically
  • To take a lead conducting environmental workshops and seminars concerning

environmental issues in Northeast Oklahoma and other areas

  • To provide a linkage with other environmental organizations throughout the state of Oklahoma and the Nation

 

LEAD will use grant funds to host a conference and provide materials, documents and books so that community members, tribes, health and governmental representatives will become more aware of the of significant health and environmental impacts known at the abandoned lead and zinc mining site designated as the Tar Creek Superfund site.

 

  1. Lynn Canal Conservation, AK

Founded in 1972, Lynn Canal Conservation (LCC)  promotes the integrity of wild lands, protects quality of life, and fosters environmental awareness in northern Southeast Alaska’s Lynn Canal, and Chilkat/Chilkoot watersheds near Haines. LCC instigated a National Audubon Society study and helped create the Alaska Chilkat Bald Eagle Preserve–home to our planet’s largest gathering of bald eagles—in the 1980s. During the 1990s, LCC was one of several lead groups that successfully saved the Tatshenshini/Alsek Rivers from development of our planet’s largest copper mine; instead, this wild watershed is protected in a Canadian provincial park and is part of the largest contiguous park and preserve in North America. During this past decade, we successfully thwarted the State of Alaska from building a 50+ mile road through pristine Tongass National Forest wildlands.

 

Lynn Canal Conservation (LCC) will use grant funding to continue to work with the Chilkat Indian Village  to spread awareness of traditional and customary land use in the Chilkat Valley by strategically publishing CIV’s position paper on the 6765-acre hard rock mining claim. LCC will begin drafting a salmon ordinance to protect the Chilkat Watershed from risks associated with the potential hard rock mine located in a tributary of the Chilkat Watershed.  Finally, LCC will continue to host educational public presentations by experts on potential economic and environmental impacts of sulfide mines.

 

  1. Northern Alaska Environmental Center, AK

Located in Fairbanks, Alaska the Northern Alaska Environmental Center (NAEC) is a grassroots organization with a 7­member Board of Directors, 9 Advisory Council Members, 6 staff, more than 50 active volunteers, and over 1,600 contributing members. The Northern Center operates 2 major programs: Arctic and the Clean Water & Mining. The NAEC promotes conservation of the environment and sustainable resource stewardship in Interior and Arctic Alaska through education and advocacy.

 

NAEC will use to conduct effective outreach to rural indigenous communities in interior and northern Alaska to encourage public participation in the permitting process for the proposed Ambler Mineral District Industrial Access Road. The proposed road would have significant negative impact to: the indigenous lifestyle in this region, fish and game habitat, and could allow multi­national mining corporations a foothold to develop large open­pit hard rock mines throughout the region.

 

  1. PLAINS JUSTICE, MT

Plains Justice was founded in 2006 and works with diverse constituencies to pursue environmental justice and to support clean energy initiatives.  The mission of Plains Justice is to provide a legal and scientific voice to make the transition to a new energy future and for northern plains communities to conserve natural resources. They partner with diverse constituencies to produce and facilitate scientific and technical resources and innovation as well as to provide legal advocacy. Core programming involves legal advocacy for communities impacted by natural resource issues, scientific research/support relative to clean energy, and innovative peer-to-peer training in the electric utility sector.

 

WMAN- IEN funds will be used for a project to reestablish rights in homestead lands on behalf of Northern Cheyenne in opposition to a proposal to develop coal surface mines on agricultural lands in southeastern Montana.  Funds will be used for legal research and fact development necessary to gather sufficient evidence and determine avenues for legal recourse in the appropriate court, and/or petitioning the U.S. Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, to establish the legitimacy of the descendants’ rights.

 

  1. Protect Our Manoomin, MN

POM was founded in February 2011 and is a non-profit.  The mission of Protect Our Manoomin is to educate and inform tribal and non-tribal people of sulfide mining and its endangerment to wild rice and the environment.  POM is an invited member of the Minnesota Environmental Partnership Mining Cluster coalition and the Clean Water Minnesota coalition.

 

The main purpose of this grant application is to secure funding for educational resources and travel expenses that will enable POM to continue our mission of opposition to non-ferrous mining in Minnesota.  This includes paying for publication of a 42 page Protect Our Manoomin coloring book with original art work.  All proceeds from the coloring book are dedicated to POM.

 

  1. San Juan Citizens Alliance, CO

The San Juan Citizens Alliance (SJCA) organizes people to protect water and air,  lands, and the character of rural communities in the San Juan Basin. Founded in 1986, San Juan Citizens Alliance is a place-based organization that for over a quarter of a century has had national significance.  The goals of SJCA are to gain permanent protections for suitable wild lands, protect our air, water, wildlife, and the diversity of cultures and societies, and help develop a norm of tackling regional issues honestly, directly, and through open and inclusive processes. Their work therefore includes pro-active collaborative programs and aggressive defense of place.

 

SJCA is working to stop the sale of the Navajo Mine from BHP/Billiton to the Navajo Nation and to stop the expansion of the Mine, currently undergoing an Environmental Impact Statement.  Grant funds will cover direct costs for volunteers:  travel and communication expenses.

 

  1. San Juan Ridge Taxpayers Association, CA

Formed in 1975, the San Juan Ridge Taxpayers Association (SJRTA) is an association of taxpaying residents and non-resident landowners of San Juan Ridge, Nevada County, united in their concern for responsive and responsible use of tax moneys by state and county agencies; committed to the maintenance of the rural environment of San Juan Ridge; wishing to keep it mostly low-density general forest and agricultural.

 

SJRTA seeks funding for the position of an Outreach Coordinator in their efforts to stop the San Juan Ridge Mine from re-opening in the heart of their rural community. While the vast majority of the work to stop the mine has been done on a volunteer basis for close to two years, increased capacity will enable the work of SJRTA to expand membership recruitment and retention, volunteer coordination, a communications plan, phone tree, data base, newsletter, website, tabling of events, and coordination with other organizations.

 

 

  1. Smith River Alliance, CA

In 1980, Smith River Alliance (SRA) was incorporated as a non-profit organization of conservation, sport fishing, recreation, and civic groups united in their support for sound management of the Smith River as a component of both the National and the California Wild and Scenic Rivers systems. The mission of SRA is to provide for long-term protection, restoration, and stewardship of natural resources in the Smith River watershed. SRA has played a leadership role in many defining projects including leading the campaign to prevent the Cal Nickel strip mine in the 1980’s to establishment of the 460+ square mile Smith River National Recreation Area in 1990.

 

SRA will utilize grant funds to accomplish the following:

  • Collaborate with Smith River Rancheria and Elk Valley Rancheria to involve their Tribal Councils in the process of blocking strip mining in the headwaters of the Smith and Illinois Rivers.

 

  • Inform local and federal entities about the impacts that the proposed strip mine will have on the headwaters of the Smith and Illinois Rivers.

 

  • Continue to use local press, petitions (which have been circulating), and the participation of key local people and organizations to advance opposition to the mine and the mineral withdrawal process.

 

  • Inform CA elected representatives.

 

  • Work with contacts inside the Department of Agriculture and the Department of the Interior to advance the mineral withdrawal process.

 

  1. Tolani Lake Enterprise, AZ

Tolani Lake Enterprises, Inc. (TLE) (dba To’ Lani’ Enterprise) was founded in 2000 as a 501(c)(3) Navajo-based organization in the Chapter community of Tolani Lake, some 60 miles east of Flagstaff in northeast Arizona. TLE’s mission is to cultivate healthy, safe, and prosperous communities by strengthening food, water, community and economic systems for Native communities in the lower Little Colorado River Valley; empowering youth; and promoting Native cultural Knowledge. Since 2011, TLE has managed critically-needed local capacity- building, technical assistance and training, natural resources conservation, sustainable community-based agriculture, renewable energy, and workforce development projects totaling $1.25 million.

 

Grant funds will be used to help empower Navajo Youth through a video-leadership project to inform Navajo communities in the Little Colorado River Valley with clear information on the impacts of uranium contamination of water quality from past uranium spillage upstream in the Navajo Nation.  This includes recruiting two to three youth interns to discuss and learn about past and current uranium issues in relation to water and public health and documenting on film community discussions and related activities in other communities.

 

 

  1. TruthAboutMining, SD

TruthAboutMining.org was established in 2012 to provide a clearinghouse of information about open pit mining in response to the misleading information put forth by mining interests.   Upon researching the behavior of mining firms, we were appalled at how mining interests published false and misleading information TruthAboutMining.org was created inform residents of Southern Arizona about the gap between economic impact of mining jobs vs the long term environmental destruction, risk to health, and risk to their vibrant tourism economy.

 

With funding, Truth About Mining will produce a series of Internet radio broadcast programs about mining.  The goal of these programs will be to clearly illustrate the link between subsurface water flows and mining activity, to highlight the ongoing environmental damage accruing from mining, and to engage listeners to consider how today’s actions create tomorrow’s living environment.  Funding will pay for software, bandwidth, hosting and marketing.

 

Mini Grant Recipents - October 2013
  1. Alliance For Appalachia, Kentucky

The Alliance for Appalachia is a regional, Central Appalachian coalition that works to end destructive coal mining practices and build a brighter future for the region. The coalition was founded in 2006 and currently has 13 member groups and growing. The Alliance was formed out of a need to have coordinated strategy in the central Appalachian region to address social justice problems. Today they work together to build regional strategy and help ensure that grassroots groups are fully represented in federal policy initiatives.

The Alliance will use funds for their Clean Water Campaign.   The Alliance will work with local communities to engage with federal policies initiatives that will lead to improved water quality across central Appalachia. Funds from this grant will be used to help support local residents to travel to the regional EPA offices in December to meet with and speak to decision makers to ensure a clean energy future for the US.

 

  1. Asubpeeschoseewagong Oshkaadiziwag Kagobewat (AOK, or Grassy Narrows Youth Organization), Ontario

AOK is a new organization that formed at the 2014 Grassy Narrows Youth Gathering, specifically in response to a workshop on environmental impacts from mining. The purpose of the new organization is to empower a new generation of youth leaders in the community that will have the skills and supports needed to organize for the purpose of protecting land in GNFN traditional territory, while promoting and empowering traditional land use activities.

AOK will use funding for the Save Keys Lake campaign, with the goal of protecting a pristine lake on Grassy Narrows First Nation traditional territory from logging, mining and other threats.  The campaign also includes a broader education component focused on land use activities and environmental threats to Grassy Narrows territory. The funding will be used for a strategic planning process and campaign launch.

 

  1. Bad River Watershed Association, Wisconsin

A group consisting of Bad River Band of Lake Superior Chippewa members, a local chapter of the League of Women Voters and Northland College faculty began meeting in 2001 to discuss the need for a watershed council in the Chequamegon Bay area of Lake Superior.  The Bad River Watershed Association (BRWA) officially formed in 2002, and has sustained a watershed-wide volunteer watershed water quality monitoring program for over eight years.

BRWA will utilize funding to attend the outreach and educational events to inform the public about mining issues, recruit new membership, and promote its advocacy for the watershed, including the Wisconsin Wetlands Association conference and Canoecopia.  BRWA will also use fuding to present a technical paper at the Wisconsin Wetlands Association conference in La Crosse, WI.  This gathering of wetland ecologists, conservationists, and outdoor sports enthusiasts will be an excellent forum for bringing BRWA’s mission and programs—in particularly monitoring and public outreach response to proposed mining in the watershed—to a statewide audience.

 

  1. Black Mesa Water Coalition, Arizona

Black Mesa Water Coalition (BWMC) is dedicated to preserving and protecting Mother Earth and the integrity of Indigenous Peoples’ cultures, with the vision of building sustainable and healthy communities. BMWC was formed in 2001 by a group of young inter-tribal, inter- ethnic people dedicated to addressing issues of water depletion, natural resource exploitation, and health promotion within Navajo and Hopi communities.

Funds from the WMAN/IEN Grassroots Communities Mini-Grants Program will allow BMWC to pay for legal consult to perform an initial analysis and develop a memo to challenge the coal complex on Black Mesa.  BMWC will also organize a meeting with attorneys and Navajo grassroots organizations to develop a strategy for dealing with the highly controversial legislation regarding the Navajo Generating Station (NGS) lease extension.  The meeting will be used to present the legal analysis conducted and discuss options for moving forward with this legal strategy.

 

  1. Comstock Residents Association, Nevada

Through both education and advocacy, CRA implements a set of goals focused on ensuring the legacy of the Comstock communities for generations to come:

  • Protecting the cultural communities of Gold Hill and Silver City NV, the center of arts and culture in the Virginia City National Historic Landmark,
  • Protecting the watersheds, biodiversity and wildlife, all integral to the lifeblood of these communities,
  • Building strategic alliances,
  • Recruiting an array of voices to promote core values,
  • Securing unlimited public access to the unique recreational opportunities for families and outdoor enthusiasts,
  • Making sound investments in educational and charitable programs.

Mini-grant funds will be used for a current project to build organizational capacity to defeat an active mining company’s application to amend the county’s master plan and change zoning.  If approved, these changes would open the way for full-scale mining operations within the town limits of Silver City, Nevada.  Monies will be used to supplement the cost of engaging consultant professional services, including land use legal counsel, an economist, an historic preservation expert, appraisers and environmental planners.

 

  1. Defenders of the Black Hills, South Dakota

Defenders of the Black Hills (DBH) was founded in August, 2002 and has remained a group of volunteers without racial or tribal boundaries with a mission to preserve, protect and restore the environment of the Fort Laramie Treaties.  Current projects include the protection of the Black Hills from logging, restoration of the Black Hills for increased wildlife habitat, and the education of the public on the number of abandoned uranium mines.

Funding will be used for DBH to travel to the Black Hills Pow Wow, the largest in the region, attracting more than 10,000 people.  DBH will do tabling at the Pow Wow, enabling the organization to pass out print material, sign petitions, and do fundraising.

 

  1. Friends of the Boundary Waters Wilderness, Minnesota

The Friends of the Boundary Waters Wilderness (FBWW) was established in 1976 to bring full wilderness protection to the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness (BWCAW). This culminated in the passing of the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness Act in 1978. The Friends has been protecting the wilderness character of the BWCAW and the Quetico-Superior ecosystem ever since through advocacy, education and research.

Friends of the Boundary Waters will use funding for their Comment Campaign to generate public responses to PolyMet Mining Corp’s project proposal for a sulfide mine in northeastern Minnesota. When the supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement (SDEIS) is released in late November, FBWW will generate over 10,000 comments by hosting “comment parties,” distributing printed outreach materials, strengthening social media networks, and targeted outreach to key constituencies including tribal organizations, business communities, recreation groups and educational institutions.

 

  1. Multicultural Alliance for a Safe Environment, New Mexico

The Multicultural Alliance for a Safe Environment (MASE) is a coalition of grassroots organizations that work to address the legacy of uranium contamination in northwestern New Mexico. MASE was formed in 2008 among communities who shared concerns over uranium-contaminated water, air, and soil and their impacts on the health of residents of our communities. MASE is a diverse coalition that represents the various cultures and ethnicities of our region, including Laguna Pueblo, Acoma Pueblo, Navajo Nation, and Anglo ranching communities who for more than 50 years have been adversely impacted by uranium mining.

MASE will use WMAN/IEN mini-grant funds to pay for technical assistance to have a health physicist work with the community surrounding Homestake Uranium Tailings Pile Superfund Site in identifying an alternate background level and location for temporary storage for contaminated soil.   They will also use funds to hold community meetings to keep residents engaged, and for travel to these meetings in 2014.

 

9 .  Native American Educational Technologies, Inc., Wisconsin

Native American Educational Technologies, Inc. (NAET) began during the Mole Lake verses Exxon battle over metallic sulfide mining in the Ceded Territory of northern Wisconsin. NAET is a 501(c)3 (since 2001) and has faced many tribal preservation struggles and have partnered with tribes and non-tribal environmental groups to help preserve the clean air, water, land, and traditional way of life needed for  hunting/fishing and gathering.

NAET seeks funding to work with the Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwa tribe and Bad River Anishinaabe to set up a Harvest Camp in the Penokee Hills, on top of the proposed mine site where a West Virginia based strip mining company plans to develop the largest open pit, mountain top removal, iron mine in the world.  Funds will be used for travel, printing of outreach material, and tech support.

 

  1. Nizhoni  Media KNIZ 90.1 FM, New Mexico

KNIZ 90.1 FM in Gallup, NM is a noncommercial, full-power, educational class radio station, licensed since 2006. Their mission is to be not just a radio station but an all inclusive healing agent that uses media as medicine. KNIZ’s goal is to heal the local community with dialogue addressing the many dilemmas by including all demographics.

Funding is requested to fund the Watchdog Project, formed to encourage youth to develop investigative citizen journalism skills by offering guidance and a legitimate, well-known media outlet to present concerns about resource extraction. The funding will provide technical training and equipment, allowing youth to generate mining-related programs that will be free and easy to access in rural and urban areas, with or without internet access.

 

  1. Organized Village of Kasaan, Alaska

The Organized Village of Kasaan (OVK) is a federally recognized tribal government that was established on October 15, 1938.  OVK is a federally recognized tribe and 501(c)3 non-profit corporation.  The organization consists of a seven member tribal council that serves 100+ tribal memberships.

Funding will be used to help enable a Southeast Alaska (Tongass) Tribal Summit on Prince of Wales Island to discuss and implement specific actions to protect downstream water quality, fish and cultural values from massive mining development proposed for the Unuk River watershed in NW British Columbia. The goal is to create a joint resolution from all Tribes and Tribal communities.  Monies will support review assistance of the project, and facilitate travel and lodging for the summit.

 

  1. Rivers Without Borders, British Columbia and Alaska

Rivers Without Borders (RWB) is a U.S. and Canadian nonprofit conservation organization dedicated to sustaining the ecological and cultural values of the northwest British Columbia – southeast Alaska transboundary watersheds. These watersheds are mostly unprotected but as yet amazingly intact.  RWB was formed in 1999, rooted in successful international efforts to stop the Windy Craggy mine proposal in the Alsek-Tatshenshini watershed.

A proposal to develop one of the largest open pit mines in North America threatens one of the continent’s wildest and most important salmon rivers. RWB seeks funds to help address an unanticipated and immediate need to generate strong comments and get them submitted as part of an Environmental Assessment review process. Funds will be used to:

  • Help pay for Ketchikan campaigner contracted services at a critical time;
  • Pay for the services of a technical expert to review the EA and assist with the preparation of comments;
  • Pay for a community outreach meeting planned in Juneau and for outreach materials.

 

  1. Ross River Dene Traditional Knowledge Program, Yukon

Ross River Dene Traditional Knowledge Program (RRDTKP) has been active for 8 years.  Their goals are (1) to collect and protect ancestral knowledge (traditional knowledge); (2) to apply this knowledge toward land planning and management; and (3) to provide programs to educate youth in environmental management and cultural awareness.

With funding from the mini-grant program, RRDTKP will participate in the development of a new mining exploration regime in the Yukon.  This opportunity is an outcome of a recent Supreme Court ruling that requires that prior to a mining claim being recorded or worked, that the prospector must consult and accommodate the concerns of the First Nation.  Funding will be used for travel to technical workshops with Government employees, as well as meetings to seek feedback from industry representatives.

 

  1. Save Our Sky Blue Waters, Minnesota

Save Our Sky Blue Waters (SOS) is concerned about the risks associated with potential metallic sulfide mining proposals in Minnesota, and across the Great Lakes Region. SOS is headquartered in Duluth, MN since 2005 and consists of residents of northeast Minnesota who oppose the opening of a sulfide mining district in what is now Superior National Forest, and who live downstream of existing and proposed mining projects.

Grant funds will be used to hire an expert in mercury groundwater transport to help ensure that mercury a local mine does not contribute to water quality violations and to unsafe mercury levels in fish, which already impact downstream residents.  Currently, the Environmental Impact Statement and wastewater discharge permit application for this proposed mine includes no analysis of the mercury that would leach into the Partridge River from mine pits and waste rock stockpiles.

 

  1. Save the Scenic Santa Ritas, AZ

Save the Scenic Santa Ritas (SSSR) formed in 1996 to protect the scenic, aesthetic, recreational and wildlife values of the Santa Rita Mountains through education and outreach, including protection of the Santa Ritas from degradation due to mining activities. Their main focus was stopping the ASARCO/Forest Service land exchange in the Rosemont Valley of the Santa Ritas, and preventing an open pit copper mine there.

 

Save the Scenic Santa Ritas seeks grant funding to complete phase two of their outreach project Lens on the Land – Rosemont: What’s at Stake. They will use funds to print images for the project and send the exhibit on tour around Tucson and beyond.  Lens on the Land is a collaborative project initiated by volunteer photographers, Save the Scenic Santa Ritas, Sky Island Alliance, the Sonoran Institute, and other key partners in Southern Arizona to shed light on what is at stake with the proposed Rosemont Mine through a series of photographic exhibitions and outreach efforts.

 

  1. Secwepemc Nation Youth Network, British Columbia

Secwepemc Nation Youth Network (SNYN) is a network of Indigenous youth, Elders and families committed to protecting/defending Secwepemc Territories for the future of culture, land and languages. SNYN formed in 2002 in response to the need for a youth-inspired organization to speak for the protection of land and water.

Secwepemc Nation Youth Network will use funds for ongoing organizing, education, and mobilization against the Imperial Metals Ruddock Creek project. Their goal in 2014 is to gain majority support in surrounding communities against this lead and zinc mine that threatens one of the largest sockeye salmon runs in the world and their Sacred Headwaters.  Funds will cover travel for meetings and printing of outreach materials.

 

  1. Southeast Alaska Conservation Council, Alaska

Since 1970, Southeast Alaska Conservation Council (SEACC) has worked to permanently preserve biologically productive Tongass wildlands, while fostering sustainable communities. As a regional conservation organization based in Southeast Alaska, their expertise has resulted in permanent protection for 1.2 million acres of wildlands in the 1990 Tongass Timber Reform Act, the defending of critical habitat against big pulp mills which closed in the 1990s, and more recently stopped the Juneau road 50+ miles northwards through Tongass wildlands and protected clean water from aerial pesticide spraying and damaging mining impacts.

SEACC requested funds to help enable a Southeast Alaska (Tongass) Tribal Summit on Prince of Wales Island to discuss and implement specific actions to protect downstream water quality, fish and cultural values from massive mining development proposed for the Unuk River watershed in NW British Columbia. The goal is to create a joint resolution from all Tribes and Tribal communities.  SEACC will use funds to provide technical review assistance for the project, including media outreach, and facilitation of travel and lodging for the summit.

 

  1. Southwest Indigenous Uranium Forum (SWIUF)/Dineh Bidziil, New Mexico

The SWIUF, a volunteer organization, and Dine’ Bidziil organizations have a history of establishing working relationships with grassroots organizations, including assisting in the establishment of Multi-cultural Alliance for a Safe Environment (MASE).  At the local level, these organizations work with environmental justice organizers on Navajo Land along with surrounding Indigenous communities to find avenues to stop new mining while advocating for cleanup of abandoned mines waste sites

SWIUF will use funds to host the International Uranium Film Festival, educating local residents about the impacts and effects of uranium mining and its relationship to nuclear power. Tribal community leaders and participants will engage in discussions with follow up actions with resolutions.  The project will include development of education materials, workshops and network to work towards a cohesive action by Indian Nations and Non-Indian allies.

 

  1. Spokane Riverkeeper Program of the Center for Justice, Washington

Since 1999, the Center for Justice has been providing nonprofit advocacy in Spokane and is dedicated to addressing civil rights, discrimination, poverty, government accountability, and the environment.  The Spokane Riverkeeper, a program of the Center, was founded in 2009.  The Center has been a leading voice on successfully addressing tough environmental issues in the Inland Northwest – stopping field burning that was polluting air, using state land use laws to stop sprawl and increase quality of life, and successfully stopping illegal discharges into waterways and stopping unwise projects that threaten fish habitat.

Funding will be used to support litigation costs associated with challenging the water quality impacts of coal transport in the Powder River Basin on Montana and Wyoming through the initiation of citizens’ suit litigation against mining companies and railroads.

 

  1. Stk’emlupsemc te Secwepemc Nation, British Columbia

The Stk’emlupsemc te Secwepemc Nation has taken on the issues of mining since 2007. They work to ensure constitutionally protected aboriginal rights to use and control resources, harvesting, development or extraction in Secwepemc Territory.

The Stk’emlupsemc te Secwepemc Nation seeks funding for Water/Copper workshops, the purpose being to elevate the traditional concepts/teachings/understandings about copper and water. Funding will provide seed money for the first in a series of workshops with experts in the field of copper mining, bringing together Elders, community members, and youth.  This time sensitive need will get community-based workshops off the ground this fall to prepare for the upcoming regional water conference to be held in the territory in spring 2015.

 

  1. Tallahassee Area Community, Colorado

The Tallahassee Area Community is a grassroots organization based in Northwest Fremont County Colorado, founded in 2008 for the purpose of protecting water, air and quality of life from the adverse effects of uranium exploration and mining.

The Tallahassee Area Community seeks funds to pay ongoing legal fees in their efforts in the Colorado Water Court to protect water from contamination due to uranium exploration.  Funds would also be used for printing costs for a pending Freedom of Information request.

 

  1. WaterLegacy, Minnesota

WaterLegacy is a Minnesota-based, grassroots 501(c)(3) non-profit founded in January 2009 in response to the imminent threat of environmental degradation from proposed sulfide mines in northeastern Minnesota.   They focus on expert technical and legal advocacy, fostering citizen engagement, building relationships with tribal allies, and collaborative engagement with agency staff and other environmental groups.

WaterLegacy will use funds for legal advocacy and mentoring of citizen expert comments to prevent destruction of wetlands, water pollution, degradation of tribal resources, impairment of wild rice and mercury contamination of fish in the St. Louis River watershed of the Lake Superior Basin resulting from the PolyMet sulfide mine proposal.

 

  1. Wisconsin Resources Protection Council, Wisconsin

The Wisconsin Resources Protection Council (WRPC) was founded in 1982 to help counter the lack of information about the effects of large-scale metallic sulfide mining on Wisconsin’s precious water supplies, on the tourism and dairy industries, and upon the many Native American communities that are located near potential mine sites. Since that time the Council has broadened its concern to include peoples and resources in not only Wisconsin but throughout the Lake Superior region in Michigan, Minnesota and Ontario. Members share a common goal: to educate the public about the consequences of allowing international mining corporations to develop a new mining district in the Lake Superior region.

WRPC has been involved in federal litigation over the past several years in efforts to hold Flambeau Mining Company accountable for Clean Water Act violations at the Flambeau Mine site near Ladysmith, WI. WRPC will use funding for covering legal costs associated with a Court of Appeals decision.

 

  1. Yellow Dog Watershed Preserve, Michigan

The Yellow Dog Watershed Preserve was created in 1995 by a group of citizens concerned about unchecked logging and property division activities. Their mission is to preserve and protect the Yellow Dog River and surrounding watersheds for the benefit of present and future generations through grassroots organizing.

Funds will be used to hire technical expertise and travel to sample water from the Iron River to gauge the performance of the Buck Mine Remediation Site.   The group will use the data collected to produce outreach materials for citizen engagement.

Mini Grant Recipents - June 2013
  1. Bad River Band of Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians, Wisconsin

The Bad River Band is a federally recognized tribe located in rural northwest Wisconsin.  It is the tribe’s mission “to work toward a more progressive, financially stable government to maintain tribal sovereignty; and enable members to progress individually towards a more fulfilling life culturally, spiritually, and economically.”  The Tribe is facing a threat of a proposed mining site in the Penokee Hills located 4 miles south of tribal lands, which could jeopardize access to clean water.

 

The tribe’s mining committee sought funding to perform outreach to the general public regarding the effects of mining on their community.  Grant funds will be used to publish a newsletter, create highway billboards, yard signs, and buttons for educational outreach purposes.

 

  1. Castle Mountain Coalition, Alaska

Castle Mountain Coalition (CMC) was founded in 2006 in response to the threat of large-scale coal development in the Matanuska Valley. Their mission is to protect the ecological integrity, economic sustainability, and quality of life within the Matanuska River watershed. CMC is a grassroots coalition of local, state, and national organizations, including (among others) the Sierra Club and Friends of Mat-Su, working together as the Mat Valley Coalition to oppose coal development,.

 

In August 2013 CMC and partners will host the second annual Alaska Mining Action Camp, focused on Indigenous sovereignty, solidarity, and direct action            to end extraction and create a livable future. The goal of the event is to    amplify the voices of Alaskans who are experiencing climate change first    hand.  Grant funds will be used to pay for facilities rental, purchase food, and reimburse travel expenses for trainers coming from out of state.

  1. Chilkat Indian Village, Alaska

The Chilkat Indian Village is a federally recognized tribal government, based in Klukwan , a small, Native village positioned on the banks of the Chilkat River in Southeast Alaska. The Constantine-Palmer Mine is a proposed copper, zinc, gold, and silver mine in a tributary of the Chilkat River, currently in the exploration stage.

 

The Chilkat seek funding to comprehensively map baseline data regarding      the community’s uses and values in the Chilkat Valley, in anticipation of    impacts related to development of the Constantine-Palmer Mine upstream.           Additional funding will be used to tell the story of the Chilkat culture and the          importance of a healthy Chilkat River to potential investors in the mine             through the writing, publication and distribution of a position paper.

 

  1. Clean Water Alliance, South Dakota

The mission of the Clean Water Alliance, founded in 2009, is to prevent radioactive mining in the Black Hills region and protect valuable resources – especially water – for future generations.  The Alliance is a diverse collection of citizens concerned about the health, environmental, and economic impacts that proposed radioactive mining projects would have on communities, people, economy, and natural resources.  They work to coordinate and facilitate the activities of grassroots groups in the region.

 

Funding will be used to hire a staff person to perform research and provide   organizational support to prepare for state water permit and state mining        permit hearings in fall 2013.  In addition, the group requests funds to         continue public education and outreach throughout the permitting      processes.

 

  1. Colorado Citizens Against ToxicWaste, Inc., Colorado

Colorado Citizens Against ToxicWaste (CCAT) is a 501(c)3 non-profit grassroots organization in Fremont County, Colorado, that formed in 2002 after the Cotter Corporation Uranium Mill announced plans to import 450,000 tons of radioactive/toxic waste for direct disposal from New Jersey.  CCAT is a diverse volunteer group with a goal to educate about radioactive industrial operations that threaten the environment, property values, health, economy, tourism industry, and social well being.  The group disseminates this information via the media, public meetings, newsletters, local and national events, and their websites.

 

CCAT will use the funds requested to pay for ongoing Colorado Open Records            Act (CORA) and Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests and records    searches to learn what negotiations and decisions are being made regarding           the superfund cleanup.  These funds would provide CCAT the ability to         submit follow-up CORA’s and FOIA’s on a monthly basis for approximately      8-months.

 

  1. The Empire-Fagan Coalition, Arizona

The Empire-Fagan Coalition was begun in 2004 as a grass-roots response to three

proposed open pit mines in this community near Tucson. The Coalition’s mission is to protect the Empire-Fagan Valley through education and advocacy.  They conduct annual meetings, public town hall events and publish a quarterly newsletter. They also work to empower the community to advocate in the complex regulatory environment of state and federal mining laws.

 

Empire-Fagan will use grant funds to underwrite a one-time educational campaign and membership drive, using mixed technologies, to reach a wider audience.  This campaign would include:

  • Direct Mail of printed material that raises awareness of the critical status of three proposed mining projects in the community.
  • Local media radio spots. The Coalition would produce short PSA-type radio spots to play in the Tucson market. This would increase awareness of our work to a wider market.
  • Production costs for media and design work.

 

  1. Eyak Preservation Council, Alaska

Conceived  at the time of the Exxon Valdez oil spill in 1989, the Eyak Preservation Council (EPC) is a Native-founded and-led grassroots group working in the

Copper River and Prince William Sound region.  The mission of the EPC is to preserve, restore and celebrate wild salmon culture and habitat through awareness, education and the promotion of sustainable livelihoods within the communities of the region.  EPC’s vision is pristine productive ecosystems that support healthy communities.

 

EPC seeks funding for The Bering River Coalition: Keep it in the   Ground            outreach and advocacy campaign. The overarching goal for this 16-year          EPC coal campaign has been to preserve the Bering River and Katalla            watersheds by purchasing the 12,000-acre Bering River coal patents and      returning them to the Chugach National Forest to be protected in perpetuity. Funds will be used for an immediate flyover of the region with a professional          photographer to gain high quality images of the area for outreach uses.

 

  1. Filters for Families, Colorado (for work in South Dakota)

Filters for Families (FFF) was formed in 2003 to provide safe water in arsenic contaminated areas of southern Nepal. In 2009, their work was brought to the Pine Ridge Reservation, SD to address water contamination and environmental health issues.  Water samples collected from private wells across the reservation and water samples from piped water tested positive for multiple metals (uranium, arsenic, lead) in drinking water above upper limits of EPA guidelines.

 

Funds from WMAN/ IEN will be used to provide 15 Sono filters to individuals             and schools of Pine Ridge. The filters will be installed in homes where           drinking water is contaminated with arsenic, lead, uranium, and other metals    and have household members with cancer, or a high risk of cancer in the future. Additionally, funds will be used for outreach, including two       workshops, a radio program about water contamination and filters,   pamphlets, and handouts.

 

  1. Gifford Pinchot Task Force, Oregon

The Gifford Pinchot (GP) Task Force has been working since 1985 to support the biological diversity and communities of the Northwest through conservation and restoration of forests, rivers, fish and wildlife. The heart of this region, the Gifford Pinchot National Forest (GPNF) remains the primary focus area. The GPNF is one of the oldest forests in the country and is home to a diversity of plants and animal species, many of which are rare, sensitive or threatened with extinction, including the elusive wolverine. The GP Task Force has been working for the last twenty-eight years to protect and restore this area.

 

GP Task Forces requests support to implement the Mount St. Helens     Protection Project to permanently protect Mount St. Helens National Volcanic             Monument and the Green River valley from mining and exploratory drilling.         WMAN/IEN funds will be used for litigation costs such as filing fees, attorney   travel, and travel for staff and volunteers as well as costs for our outreach             efforts.

 

  1. Lynn Canal Conservation, Alaska

The mission of Lynn Canal Conservation (LCC) in the Chilkat Valley of Alaska is to promote ecosystem integrity, protect quality of life and foster environmental awareness. For over 40 years, Lynn Canal Conservation has been instrumental in grassroots efforts that have resulted in protecting ecosystems and quality of life for those who live in the region.  Specifically, LCC provides strong environmental advocacy to safeguard water quality and fish and wildlife habitat and hosts educational programs that increase environmental awareness to encourage citizens to become engaged in protecting the ecosystems and watersheds.

 

LCC will use grant funds to produce a series of short films to document the      traditional and customary land use in the Chilkat Valley that could be     impacted by a high sulfide mine and the importance of subsistence activities           for community health and well being. Also, LCC will work with the Chilkat         Indian Village Tribal Government and other user groups to form a work             group whose purpose is drafting a salmon ordinance to protect the Chilkat      Watershed from risks associated with a potential 6,765-acre hard rock mine       located in a tributary of the Chilkat Watershed.

 

  1. Native American Educational Technologies, Inc.. Wisconsin

Native American Educational Technologies, Inc. (NAET), a 501(c)3 corporation since 2001, was formed during the Mole Lake vs. Exxon battle over metallic sulfide mining in the Ceded Territory of northern Wisconsin. The group has faced many tribal preservation struggles and has partnered with tribes and non-tribal environmental groups to help preserve the clean air, water and land necessary for a traditional way of life. The prospect of mining, and its threats to this way of life, has returned. Partnered with IndianCountryTV.com, NAET is the primary source of information, with volunteers traveling thousands of miles from reservations to the state capitol and back again to provide online/TV coverage of hearings, rallies, and ceremonies all centered around protecting native homelands from the risks of mining.

 

NAET is working with local tribes to set up an occupying camp, called Harvest Camp, in the Penokee Hills, on top of the proposed mine site where a strip mining company plans to disrupt sacred hills for the largest open pit,            mountain top removal iron mine in the world, including acid mine drainage.        Funds will be used to pay mileage for travel, printing brochures/picture of     proposed mine site to encourage allies, and tech support for online outreach.

 

  1. Native Village of Tyonek, Alaska

The Tyonek native peoples are referred to as the Tubughna, “Beach People”, and are located 35 air miles from Anchorage across the Cook Inlet in the village of Tyonek.  The Native Village of Tyonek (NVT) administers proactive Social Service, Environmental, Housing, Elders and Youth programs on behalf of the NVT Tribal Members.  The NVT relies on a subsistence lifestyle that is centuries old, and wild, healthy salmon are a vital component of NVT’s traditional way of life. Today, there exists a threat to the NVT traditional native way of life through the development of a mine along the sacred Chuitna River, in order to extract coal for Asian markets.

 

NVT will utilize grant funds in its “No Coal” Strategic Plan and Funding Strategy             campaign.  Specifically, WMAN/ IEN funding will sponsor 30-45 Cook Inlet   Native Youth to Tyonek for a Culture Camp during the summer of 2013 to network, raise awareness and develop strategies to protect sacred resources.        Simultaneously key relationships will be developed, youth will be mentored,         traditional methods of harvesting local foods will be practiced, and native        language will be taught.  The goal of Culture Camp is to build tribal capacity,        develop communication strategies and create short and long range strategic plans.

 

  1. Piedmont Residents In Defense of the Environment (PRIDE), Virginia

PRIDE (Piedmont Residents In Defense of the Environment), a chapter of the Blue Ridge Environmental Defense League, formed when citizens became aware of an aggregate manufacturer that burned hazardous wastes in the southern part of Pittsylvania Co., VA.  Though dormant for many years following, PRIDE was re-activated in 2011 with a vision of “the practice of earth stewardship and open government by our league members, by our government and the public.” The group works to keep in place Virginia’s 30+year moratorium on uranium mining.

 

Grant funds will be used to further the “Keep the Ban” campaign by leasing     billboard signs along major highways to provide maximum exposure to the       issue and direct citizens to www.keeptheban.org .  Also, signage will be          created and hung in three county ballparks to reinforce the message of Keep         the Ban.

 

  1. Resisting Environmental Destruction on Indigenous Lands, Alaska

Resisting Environmental Destruction on Indigenous Lands (REDOIL) is a movement of Alaska Natives of the Inupiat, Yupik, Aleut, Tlingit, Eyak, Gwich’in and Denaiana Athabascan Tribes who came together in June 2002 in Cordova, Alaska to challenge the fossil fuel and mining industries to use practices that result in a safe and healthy environment.  REDOIL aims to address the human and ecological health impacts brought on by unsustainable development practices of the fossil fuel and mineral industries. REDOIL works directly with affected communities facing oil and mining proposals, emphasizing collaborative and strategic partnerships.

 

REDOIL will use funding to cover travel costs to bring frontline mining            impacted community members to the Rising Tide Alaska Action Camp. The          goals of the training camp are:

  • Bring together a diverse group of Indigenous People including grassroots leaders, Tribal government leaders, youth, elders, etc. to discuss the issues of fossil fuels, mining and climate change;
  • Ensure a baseline knowledge of fossil fuels, mining and climate change issues (impacts, policies, key questions, key players) among participants;
  • Identify regional impacts, key issues, research needs, policy positions, and next steps concerning fossil fuel, mining and climate change for Alaska Natives.

 

  1. Tsilhqot’in National Government, British Columbia

The Tsilhqot’in National Government was established in 1989 to meet the needs of and represent the 6 Tsilhqot’in communities of Tlet’inqox, Esdilagh, Yunesit’in, Tsi Del Del, Tl’esqox and Xeni Gwet’in in their efforts to re-establish a strong political government structure.  The communities work as a Nation to gain Tsilhqot’in Aboriginal Rights and Title to the lands we call Tsilhqot’in.

 

The Tsilhqot’in seek funding to strengthen and organize voices for upcoming panel hearings for an environmental assessment for a proposed open-pit,   gold and copper mine within the heart of their territory. Funding will be used        to host a cultural camp in summer 2013 prepare youth for the upcoming       panel hearings.

 

  1. Unist’ot’en Camp, British Columbia

The Unist’ot’en Camp is a resistance community, in operation since 2009, whose purpose is to protect sovereign Wet’suwet’en territory from several proposed mining projects, pipelines from the tar sands project, and shale gas from hydraulic fracturing projects in the Peace River Region.  The camp is a large annual gathering bringing together hundreds of Indigenous activists and allies for relationship-building, skills and action training, and strategizing on efforts to resist unsustainable resource extraction.

 

WMAN/IEN grant funds will be used to purchase building material to build a traditional pithouse on sovereign Wet’suwet’en land.    Funding will also be           used to develop campaign materials, such as videos and leaflets, to raise       awareness of the impact of the mine about the proposed mining operation,             and to host community gatherings and information sessions for more   effective outreach.  Additional funds will cover travel costs to attend    gatherings with shared purpose and to attend mining company annual     meetings.

Mini Grant Recipents - February 2013
  1. Aligning for Responsible Mining (ARM), Nebraska

Aligning for Responsible Mining (ARM) is an Oglala Sioux Tribe nonprofit formed in 2007 to: (a) cause the International Precautionary Principle to be applied to all mining activities, (b) train people in the technical aspects of testing, monitoring and reporting of the impacts of mining activities, and (c) prevent abusive mining.

 

ARM received a grant to pay expert witness fees for two hearings related to ongoing opposition to uranium mining in the Black Hills and in traditional Lakota territory which adversely affect the Oglala and other aquifers.

 

  1. Arizona Mining Reform Coalition, Arizona

The Arizona Mining Reform Coalition was formed in 2006 to coordinate and share information with Arizona groups working on hard rock mining issues. It was also set up to work on reform of the 1872 Mining Law and to eventually reform Arizona state mining laws. The Arizona Mining Reform Coalition works to protect the state’s environment and the health and economic wellbeing of citizens by working to improve mining rules and regulations and by opposing irresponsible mining.

 

The WMAN-IEN grant will fund community outreach efforts to educate the general public, the media, and decision-makers on the importance of the greater Oak Flat watershed for religious freedom, ecosystem protection, and recreation in light of the danger Oak Flat is facing from large mining companies (Rio Tinto and BHP) who wish to build a destructive underground mine.

 

  1. Appalachian Citizens’ Law Center, Kentucky

The Appalachian Citizens’ Law Center (ACLC) is a nonprofit law firm that fights for justice in the coalfields by working with grassroots groups and individuals to protect the land and people of Appalachia from misuse and degradation caused by extractive industries and by representing coal miners and their families on issues of black lung and mine safety.  ACLC handles individual cases and engages in strategic litigation, organizing and policy work in the areas of environmental protection, sustainable energy, and mine safety and health.

 

ACLC requested funds to support their Environmental Law Project to create a training for citizen groups on the process of establishing “standing”- the legal right to litigate over environmental damages – based on the provisions of the Clean Water Act.  This training will allow citizens groups to better respond to the impacts of mountaintop removal mining.

 

 

  1. The Center for Water Advocacy, Alaska

The Center for Water Advocacy (CWA), founded in 2003, is a non-profit public interest conservation organization which focuses exclusively on the long-term sustainability of water resources for the benefit of fish and wildlife populations, habitat, aesthetics, recreation, subsistence and traditional and cultural activities, throughout Alaska, using the principles of democracy, environmental justice, and sound ecology as its guide.

 

CWA will develop and coordinate the Sixth Annual Tribal Water Rights Conference to take place in Anchorage, Alaska in October 2013 at the Alaska Native Heritage Center which is an educational and cultural institution for all Alaskans. WMAN/IEN Grassroots Communities Mining Mini-Grant funds will be spent on rental of the facility and related costs.

 

  1. ecoCheyenne, Wyoming

ecoCheyenne was founded in November of 2012 in response to the threat of the proposed Tongue River Railroad and Otter Creek coal mine, both seeking state and federal permits for construction and operation.  ecoCheyenne’s mission is to prevent the construction of these coal mines, as well as proposed coal mines on the Northern Cheyenne reservation in the future.

 

ecoCheyenne requested funds from WMAN/IEN Grassroots Communities Mining program in order to conduct community education activities, advocacy efforts and travel to lobby on mining issues.

 

  1. Fair Mining Collaborative, British Columbia

The Fair Mining Collaborative (FMC) was created in 2002 (as Environmental Mining Education Foundation), a charitable companion to the Environmental Mining Council of BC. The Fair Mining Collaborative provides values-based, credible, technical and strategic guidance to communities, First Nation leadership groups, and political decision makers with the intention of building capacity to make informed land use decisions that foster healthy sustainable communities and ecosystems.

 

FMC is preparing to release the Fair Mining Code (the Code) and the Mine Medicine Manual (a step-by-step companion to the Code that contains practical assistance for First Nation resource managers and affected community members) in April 2013. The Code, the culmination of three years of work, summarizes the best mining laws and practices from around the world used by Indigenous governments, and compares them to BC mining law. The Code is a tool First Nation communities can use to determine if mining projects are using best practices at every stage of mine life, to protect their interests, and negotiate effectively.  FMC received funds to develop and implement a communication strategy to raise awareness of, and distribute the Code using social media and a new website.

 

  1. Fish Lake Alliance, British Columbia

The Fish Lake Alliance was formed in the spring of 2012, following the second proposal for a proposed gold-copper project in the region. With upcoming environmental review and panel hearings, the mandate of the group is to be a public voice of opposition to this project, and to be a visible alliance of local residents representing diverse cultures, diverse concerns, and a shared position.

 

The purpose of funding is two-fold: to inform and engage the public in debating the proposed “New Prosperity” Mine and to present a strong case at the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency hearings that approval should be denied. Activities include creation of printed materials, management of a website and hosting three public outreach meetings.

 

  1. Great Basin Resource Watch (GBRW), Nevada

Great Basin Resource Watch’s mission is to protect the air, water, land and communities in the Great Basin (both human and nonhuman) from the adverse affects of resource extraction and industrial development.  It was founded in 1994 by representatives from the environmental, Native American and scientific communities.

 

The group will use WMAN/IEN funds to defray legal costs, including research and filing of the legal complaint preliminary injunction, in order to prevent irreparable damage to water and cultural resources near Nevada mines. Funding will also defray costs associated with organizing supporters in Eureka County, Shoshone territory and statewide.

 

  1. Information Network for Responsible Mining (INFORM), Colorado

INFORM is Colorado’s only watchdog organization dedicated to monitoring all hardrock

mining issues affecting the state. INFORM was founded in 2001 and with seed money

from the Mineral Policy Center in 2005, assumed its current role of reviewing all state

and federal hardrock permitting activities in Colorado; participating in public processes;

advocating for enforcement of environmental laws and best mining practices; working with and supporting community-based organizations on mining issues and proposals;

and providing information about mining to the public.

 

INFORM was granted funds to co-host, with Uranium Watch, a “Uranium Confab” in late summer in Flagstaff, Arizona. The purpose of the Confab is to gather WMAN members and other activists from around the West, network, share information and ideas, and strategize for cooperating on regional issues.  Funds will cover travel costs, food and facility rental.

 

  1. Kamloops Area Preservation Association (KAPA), British Columbia

The purpose of Kamloops Area Preservation (KAPA) is to preserve and encourage the economic, environmental, human health and welfare of present and future generations of people in the City of Kamloops and the surrounding area.  KAPA was founded in 2011 by a diverse group of people who came together to oppose the proposed Ajax mine development, a massive open-pit copper/gold mine, located partially within Kamloops city limits.

 

KAPA’s requested funds to provide financial assistance for independent experts to reference Hydrology and Geographical Analysis reports documenting the findings from the impact of the small historic Afton mine, closed in 1997.  Also, the group will use funds to inform the public of adverse potential damage resulting from a 6,000 acre open-pit copper/gold mine.

 

  1. Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho

The Nez Perce Tribe Watershed division has been implementing habitat restoration work in an effort to increase numbers of endangered Chinook salmon (Nacòx) and steelhead (Hey-ey) within the Tribes Ceded Territory.  The Nez Perce Tribe culture and religion are intimately interwoven with both Nacòx and Hey-ey.  There are numerous environmental issues impacting these culturally important fish, with mining (and its effect on water) being one of them.

 

The Nez Percce Tribe was granted funds for outreach/educational purposes to increase tribal awareness of mining impacts occurring within the Tribes Ceded Territory.  The tribal will host 5 Nez Perce high school students for two days at the Midas Gold proposed mine site to become aware of the current operations and the potential situation. Students will plant trees as part of an old mine site rehabilitation. When the students return, they will report their findings to the governing body of the Tribe and to their fellow classmates.

 

  1. Redwire Native Youth Media Society, British Columbia

Redwire incorporated as an independent aboriginal youth society in November of 2002. Their mission is to create accessible media communication for Native youth across Turtle island and provides a forum for Native youth to express their views and opinions. Redwire also works to raise awareness of relevant issues for Native youth: health and healing resources, promoting awareness of Native and Indigenous issues, human rights issues, cultural survival, local events, education and employment information pertaining to Native and Indigenous youth.

 

Funding will be used to publish a volume of Redwire Magazine entitled  “Idle Know More” as a strategic project to educate and inform those most impacted by proposed legislation that terminates Aboriginal rights and title in order to access First Nations territory for development, including mining, fracking and oil pipelines. Funds will be used to re-start Redwire Magazine (after a 5 year hiatus) and publish a guide and learning kit of information on resource extraction and mining.

 

  1. Red Cliff Mining Task Force, Wisconsin

The Red Cliff Tribal Council formed the Red Cliff Mining Task Force in 2012.  The purpose of the task force is to have a centralized, community-based group within the Tribe that meets to discuss mining issues in the region.  The Task Force develops positions and strategies on new mining proposals and legislation.  The Task Force also seeks to build coalitions with other tribes and environmental groups with similar ideologies.  The core members of the Tribe’s Mining Task Force are composed of tribal staff, tribal council members, tribal elders, and community members.

 

WMAN/IEN mini-grant funds will be used to support mining initiatives that will resist mining projects that harm Lake Superior.  This includes new mines and mine expansions in Minnesota and Michigan.  The Mining Task Force intends to use the funds specifically for travel and public meeting expenses.  Travel expenses will be devoted to future hearings or peaceful protests that are scheduled around the state to oppose new mining legislation.

 

  1. Save the Wild U.P. Action (SWUP), Michigan

SWUP was founded in 2004 to protect Eagle Rock from mining by Rio Tinto. Although the mine is now being constructed, the group works to engage and empower citizens to ensure the mine is kept “in check” and state and federal permits are obeyed, as we work to stop abusive mining in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.

 

SWUP was funded to protect the Trap Hills of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula from unsustainable degradation and development by advocating for it to be established as a National Recreation Area (NRA).   This includes money for drafting a GIS map of the proposed NRA, creation of outreach materials and travel to strategic meetings.

 

  1. Soaring Eagle Express Incorporated, New Mexico

The Soaring Eagle Express Incorporated (SEEI), founded in 2012, is a grass-roots organization of Diné families who have experienced and lived with the impacts of uranium mining and milling in the Church Rock mining area in Coyote Canyon Chapter since the 1960s. Their mission is to restore the uranium contaminated environment, improve the health of community members, and protect and preserve the natural and cultural environment where they live.

 

SEEI requests funding to attend the 2013 Uranium Contamination Stakeholder Conference in New Mexico in 2013. They will collaborate with stakeholders on the multi-agency Henry Waxman Five-Year Plan to find effective solutions to uranium contamination on the Eastern Navajo Nation. They will also conduct public outreach meetings to address environmental and public health impacts of abandoned uranium mines.

 

  1. Tachee Uranium Concerns Committee, Arizona

The Tachee/Blue Gap Uranium Clean-up Committee (TUCC), was formed in 2009 by members of families from Tachee/Blue Chapter of the Navajo Nation concerned about the effect of long-abandoned uranium mines on their land, water and health. The organization has convened education forums resulting in significantly increased community involvement in uranium exposure compensation programs and the Navajo Birth Cohort study and expanded investigation on radiation in the community near mines and in homes.

 

TUCC will plan and convene a series of community education meetings to continue to inform and provide opportunities for action by Navajo herders, youth and leaders in communities with uranium-related health and environmental concerns. TUCC plans to develop and distribute multi-media educational materials related to history of the uranium-affected Navajo communities, effects of inactive uranium mines on soil air and water, uranium exposure compensation programs, opportunities for participation in Navajo environmental health studies, and indoor radon investigations in contaminated structures for use in meetings Navajo Nation communities.

 

  1. To Nizhoni Ani (TNA), Arizona

To Nizhoni Ani is comprised of, and focused on, the Navajo communities whose traditional homesites and grazing lands are in and around the Black Mesa coal mine complex. TNA is the sister organization of Black Mesa Water Coalition (BMWC), formed in 2001 by a group of young inter-tribal, inter-ethnic people dedicated to addressing issues of water depletion, natural resource exploitation, and health promotion within Navajo and Hopi communities. BMWC works to end dependence on the fossil fuel industry in order to realize the true potential of Navajo and Hopi people.

 

To Nizhoni Ani, in cooperation with Black Mesa Water Coalition (BMWC), seeks to implement community education and advocacy programs to expand support for sustainable development through construction and operation of renewable energy projects, including commercial-scale solar and wind. The project will focus on increasing government and investor commitments for renewable power development for reclaimed portions of the Black Mesa mines in the Black Mesa area. Community resolutions were passed in 2010 advocating renewable energy operations on reclaimed lands.

 

  1. Curyung Tribe, Verner Wilson, Alaska

Curyung is a federally recognized tribe and member of Nunamta Aulukestai “Caretakers of Our Lands”, a coalition of Alaska Native organizations working to protect Bristol Bay from Pebble mine.

 

Tribal member Verner Wilson was funded to attend the 2013 Anglo-American Mining Company Shareholders meeting in London, United Kingdom on behalf of the Curyung Tribe. The Curyung Tribe in Bristol Bay, Alaska would be affected by Anglo-American’s proposed Pebble Mine in Bristol Bay, which is home to the world’s largest sockeye salmon fishery. Verner plans to assist efforts to pressure Anglo-American to divest from the Pebble Mine project, network with others who are affected by Anglo-American’s mining operations in other parts of the world, and conduct media interviews from the indigenous perspective.

 

  1. Yellow Dog Watershed Preserve, Michigan

The Yellow Dog Watershed Preserve (YDWP) is a grassroots organization started in 1995 by local residents who were concerned with excessive resource extraction in the watershed. They formed the group with the mission of preserving and protecting the watershed and adjacent areas for the benefit of present and future generation. They began fulfilling their mission by monitoring the conditions of the water and the resource extraction activities that threatened its condition. In 2002, Rio Tinto/Kennecott began the process of opening Michigan’s first sulfide mine in the Salmon-Trout River watershed. The group led a large coalition in attempting to stave off this project using all methods possible, including advocacy, monitoring, legal strategies, and education.

 

YDWP requested funds to travel to London to attend the Rio Tinto Annual Meeting.  This is an opportunity to talk with investors about the company’s involvement in this community, to speak to the board of Rio Tinto during the meeting, and to network with other groups (both indigenous and non-indigenous) about working to protect this region’s communities/watersheds from negative mining impacts.

 

 

Mini Grant Recipents - October 2012
  1. Action for the Environment (ACT), South Dakota

ACT is a non-profit organization founded in 1985 to protect the environment in the Black Hills of South Dakota.  They are a volunteer- run organization with 250 members.  ACT works closely with other environmental groups (including indigenous groups) on a variety of issues, but mining issues comprise the majority of their work.

 

Funding from WMAN will be used to support ACT’s efforts to stop a gold mine from being developed on the rim of Spearfish Canyon, the “crown jewel” of the Black Hills and a sacred site for local indigenous peoples.  More specifically, monies will be applied to printing costs, travel to public meetings, and to hire a consultant and attorney.

 

  1. Ancestral Pride (AP), British Columbia

Ancestral Pride is an organization committed to the restoration and protection of the balance of the lands and waters of the Ahousaht in British Columbia. Bringing together grassroots activists, academics, traditional governance, and community members, Ancestral Pride was conceived to further establish the values of indigenous people’s close relationship with their lands and waters in terms of action and responsibility. Actively engaged in issues around housing, community sustainability, food security, and cultural resurgence for the last 4 years, Ancestral Pride is maturing into a network of indigenous peoples committed to assisting other indigenous communities in their challenges.

 

AP will use grant funds in an attempt to stop Imperial Metals from constructing a copper mine in the UNESCO-protected Clayoquot Biosphere Reserve on a sacred location known as Chitaapi.  Their goal is to protect Chitaapi and surrounding area from the damage associated from industrialized metal extraction processes. Due to the remoteness of the location of the primary community (Ahousaht) and the proposed site, monies will be used to purchase of a boat to transport people and materials for building a resistance camp to oppose attempts at mining this site.

 

  1. Bluewater Valley Downstream Alliance (BVDA), New Mexico

The Bluewater Valley Downstream Alliance (BVDA) is a grassroots community organization that is working to address a 90-foot high, 200-acre pile of toxic radioactive uranium mill waste pile near Milan, New Mexico. BVDA is a core group member of the Multicultural Alliance for a Safe Environment which is indigenous-led and includes community members from Laguna Pueblo, Acoma Pueblo, and the Navajo Nation.

 

BVDA requested emergency funds from the WMAN/IEN to cover costs of hiring technical assistance as they respond to the Corrective Action Plan (CAP) proposed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.  These technical assistants would be a hydrogeologist, an engineer with experience in reclamation and financial assurance cost estimation, and an expert on nuclear waste disposal.

 

  1. California Indian Environmental Alliance (CIEA), California

CIEA is an environmental nonprofit working locally and globally to address mining toxins left over from the California Gold Rush.  Their mission is to protect and restore California Indian People’s cultural traditions, ancestral territories, means of subsistence and environmental health. CIEA is a nonprofit guided by a four member Board of Directors who are all California Indian.

 

These funds will be used to support Indigenous People’s participation in the global Mercury Treaty development, in January 2013 in Geneva, Switzerland.  The group’s goals are to advocate for the inclusion of Indigenous Peoples in the operative text and for a separate article on health. CIEA will conduct outreach and awareness in advance of the upcoming negotiations with Indigenous communities nationally, with the goal of demonstrating how United States international policy is affecting indigenous communities.

 

  1. Coal River Mountain Watch, West Virginia

Coal River Mountain Watch’s mission is to stop the destruction of communities and environment by mountaintop removal mining, to improve the quality of life in the Coal River area, and to help rebuild sustainable communities. CRMW was formed in 1998 by a group of citizens concerned about the growing problem of mountaintop removal coal mining (MTR).

 

Mini-grant funding will be used to print a newsletter, provide travel assistance, and publicize upcoming hearings and court dates with a goal to turn out citizens for public comment and to oppose the mountaintop removal permits being advanced for Coal River Mountain.

 

  1. CoalWatch Comox Valley Society, British Columbia

CoalWatch Comox Valley Society is a citizens’ group caring for the land, air, and water and promoting a healthy future for communities.  Their current focus is to identify and research issues regarding the proposed Raven Underground Coal Mine Project near Fanny Bay.

 

CoalWatch will use mini-grant funds to host public meetings in the final phase of the environmental review process for the mine permit. These expenses include the rental of facilities to conduct several public meetings, advertising and print materials, legal expertise as required and related travel expenses.

 

 

  1. Comstock Residents Association, Nevada

The Comstock Residents Association was formed in February, 2011 as an incorporated nonprofit in the State of Nevada. Their mission is to preserve the quality of life and protect community values from exploitation of the environment.

 

The goal of this project is to allow the group to build organizational capacity to stop egregious, full-scale open-pit mining in the Virginia City National Historic Landmark (VCNHL) and the Carson River Mercury Superfund site. The WMAN/IEN mini-grant will be used to supplement the cost of engaging professional services to inform their outreach campaign, including legal counsel and website development.

 

  1. Deebege Newe, Nevada

Deebege Newe was formed by Western Shoshone people to support the land and people of the Great Basin.  Deebege Newe is literally translated to English meaning “Real Western Shoshone. Deebege Newe is the platform for support of the traditional Western Shoshone government.

 

With mini-grant funding, Deebegee Newe proposes to hire a researcher/ consultant to assist in creation of a timeline to identify the current mining activity occurring within Western Shoshone territory. Mining activity on the timeline will be prioritized by the size of the mining activity and the proximity to sensitive Native American cultural properties. The timeline will be hosted on the Deebege Newe website. The group will then conduct outreach and education to Native American stakeholders within the Great Basin about mining and environmental assessment process used to approve mining and the consequential impacts that threaten tribal communities.

 

  1. Friends of the Land of Keweenaw (FOLK), Michigan

FOLK is an active all-volunteer organization located in the western Upper Peninsula of Michigan.  It works with other state and national organizations to protect and preserve the ecological integrity of the Lake Superior Watershed.  FOLK was established in 1989 in response to the proposed construction of a $1.2 billion bleach kraft pulp/paper mill near Keweenaw Bay.  It would have had devastating environmental and economic consequences.   FOLK assumed leadership of the campaign that was launched to stop the paper mill.  In less than a year, its efforts and those of many caring citizens prevailed, forcing the withdrawal of the pulp mill proposal.

 

Funding will be used to bring Montana economics professor Dr. Thomas Power to the western Upper Peninsula to complete and disseminate a study of the economic impact of the renewal of mining on the area. The group will also create an outreach program to ensure that the report’s findings are widely and effectively disseminated.

 

  1. Friends of the San Juans, Washington

Friends of the San Juans (FSJ) was founded in 1979 to support local efforts to manage growth and protect natural environments in San Juan County (SJC).  Since then, FSJ’s activities have expanded to include: cultural restoration, marine research and habitat restoration, ecological stewardship and conservation, land use and environmental compliance, community engagement and education, and endangered species protection.

 

Funding will be used to engage, inform and mobilize the islands against proposed coal and tar sands export facilities in the Salish Sea.  This campaign will include a county-wide mailer and NO COAL signage, plus room rental and travel costs for a consultant for public forums on the issue.

 

  1. Headwaters, Inc., Kentucky

Headwaters began in 2001 as a collaborative research initiative between Eastern

Kentucky University’s Center for Appalachian Studies and the citizens of Letcher County. Originally titled The Letcher County Headwaters Project, it sought to address various environmental problems that have afflicted the county as a result of mining, timber removal, and other industrial operations. Additionally, it asked citizens to examine the correlations between water quality and health in communities along the North Fork of the Kentucky River. Finally, it experimented with ways to educate community members on scientific methods for analyzing water safety in order to ingrain a sense of personal responsibility over the environment.

 

Headwaters plans to create a river trail system around the North Fork of the Kentucky River that emphasizes water quality, stimulates economic development, and instills community stewardship of the environment. Funding from WMAN will be used for hiring consultation and printing capacity-building literature, such as informational newsletters that detail Letcher County’s problems with acid mine drainage and bacteria contamination in the county’s streams.

 

  1. Nak’azdli Band, British Columbia

Nak’azdli Band is a First Nations indigenous community in northcentral British Columbia. They are members of the Carrier Sekani Tribal Council. Nak’azdli has a total membership of 1,812 members. The Mt. Milligan Gold and Copper Mine has been approved in the territory of Nak’azdli. This project is owned by a US company – Thompson Creek Metals out of Denver. The local community is experiencing many social impacts from construction and the company has refused to talk about an impact benefits agreement with the Nak’azdli Nation. In April the company applied to amend the environmental certificate that they have been granted. Nak’azdli has no budget for reviewing the amendment package and for engaging outside experts. Nak’azdli would like to bring forward comments about amendments and push for more involvement in the environmental monitoring of this project by our members.

 

The WMAN-IEN mini grant is to assist Nak’azdli to prepare a document to present to the BC Environmental Assessment Office. Nak’azdli needs to engage a wildlife biologist, socio-economic expert, and fisheries biologist to work with community members to assess the impacts these changes will have on our members. They will also organize a few community sessions to go share this information with community members in a culturally appropriate way. Nak’azdli will gather comments from community members and compile a document that can be provided to the British Columbia Environmental Assessment Office.

 

 

  1. Nizhoni Media, New Mexico

KNIZ, 90.1 FM is a non-commercial, educational-class radio station, located in Gallup, New Mexico.  Their mission is to not just be a radio station but an all-inclusive healing agent that uses media as medicine.  Gallup can be hostile and has a legacy of conflict around colonization and careless resource extraction. KNIZ includes all demographics rather than a marginalized few in this healing process. We strive to promote the beauty and diversity of Gallup, by promoting independent thinking via community-based journalism and an independent music format.

 

WMAN funding will be used to train indigenous youth and allied community members in research, interviewing and other information-gathering techniques, empowering them to inform the community of mining projects and environmental impacts associated with mining. The monies requested will be used for portable equipment and training sessions. It can be difficult for interviewees in rural communities to travel to our station and many of the events we wish to cover are in the field. The group will purchase portable recording gear that can be taken to the field. A computer that can edit recordings and be used for production and distribution via the internet is also essential. Other parts of the funds will go toward a training contract with an indigenous, local journalism specialist. The sessions will be focused on research, story development and journalism ethics.

 

  1. Purple Thistle Centre, British Columbia

Since 2001, Purple Thistle Centre has run an alternative-to-school community institution for youth on the Eastside of Vancouver.  Currently, it operates a 2500 sq/ft resource centre with supplies, tools, materials, classes and workshops, available to youth at no cost. It is comprised of a library, bike repair shop, computer lab, silk-screening room, animation facility and more.  The Centre is run by a youth collective that controls all operations.

 

The mini-grant project will fund a group of Native youth to develop an online global map that pinpoints locations of indigenous campaigns against mining projects by Canadian-based mining corporations that are operating on their respective territories. Visitors to the website will be able to click on a marked point on the map, and information about the indigenous struggle in that area will pop up. There will also be a message board where people can post news and resources about current struggles.  Funds will purchase website hosting, a designer and print costs associated with the project.

 

  1. Save the Scenic Santa Ritas (SSSR), Arizona

SSSR was formed in 1996 to protect the scenic, aesthetic, recreational and wildlife values of the Santa Rita Mountains through education and outreach, including protection of the Santa Ritas from degradation due to mining activities. The group includes members of the Sierra Club, Tucson Audubon Society, The Wildlands Project, the Sonoran Institute, League Of Conservation Voters, and the Wrong Mountain Wildlife Preserve, not to mention many local citizens from Tucson, Sonoita, Vail, and Elgin.

 

Save the Scenic Santa Ritas was awarded $3,000 to inform the public about the proposed Rosemont mine in Southern Arizona. Funding would go directly to helping secure television coverage of the short documentary “Cyanide Beach”, filmed and produced by investigative reporter John Dougherty. The film is an important and timely story looking at parallels between the proposed Rosemont mine, and a mining proposal in Sardinia, Italy, previously owned by top executives of Rosemont Copper Company’s parent company, Augusta Resource.  Funding will be used to advertise and promote the screening.

 

  1. Secwepemc Nation Youth Network (SCYN), British Columbia

Secwepemc Nation Youth Network is a network of indigenous youth, elders and families committed to protecting/defending indigenous territories for the future of Secwepemc culture, land and languages. SNYN formed in 2002 because of the need to have a youth-inspired organization to speak the protection of land and water. The group has organized events in the community and nation including: cultural protection/survival camps, protests, demonstrations, action camps, Protection of Mother Earth speaking panels, Indigenous Peoples Assemblies.

 

The grant will support SCYN in doing outreach work in efforts against Imperial Metals’ exploratory lead and zinc mine, the Ruddock Creek Project. The mission of the project is to educate the community about the mining taking place within their Territory. This proposed mine is threatening the Sacred Headwaters and sockeye salmon spawning grounds.  Funding will cover costs for a strategic planning meeting with other indigenous nations to write a Joint Opposition Statement and press release, creation of video and photo documentation of region, creation of a mural for public awareness, and printing costs for materials.

 

  1. Southwest Indigenous Uranium Forum/Dineh Bidziil, New Mexico

Southwest Indigenous Uranium Forum/ DBC envisions an equal opportunity for grassroots organizations to apply their sovereign right by the 1st amendment based on the freedom of speech for the preservation of the earth, cultural and traditional concerns, inherent languages with indigenous knowledge for future generations. Since December 2000 , this group has consisted of 14 grassroots groups across the Navajo Nation with an additional 11 non-Navajo Tribal and non-Navajo organizations.

 

Grant monies will be used for an education and outreach project to address indigenous rights, economic exploitation, racial economic justice, and to relearn the indigenous history.  Focus will be on the work that has been implemented by the UN-Indigenous Rights of Indigenous Peoples Group; specifically to support indigenous communities in the utilization of these documents to stop negative mining activities. Work will include hosting meetings with impacted communities to draft six resolutions.  Next steps will be to expand the educational outreach on more in-depth training on each resolution topic. The training presenters will be native professionals who have background in research and direct participation issues related to these resolutions.

 

  1. Uranium Watch (UW), Utah

UW was established in 2006 to address the health, safety, and environmental issues associated with uranium mining and milling—the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle. UW works to educate and advocate for protection of public health and the environment from past, current, and future impacts of uranium mining and uranium recovery. UW is a citizen information, research, networking, and environmental action project. Their long-term goal is to reduce or eliminate the adverse impacts of uranium mining and milling and any other nearby nuclear fuel cycle facilities, including the proposed nuclear reactor (Blue Castle Project) at Green River, Utah, less than 50 miles from Moab.

 

UW received funding for the “Zombie Mine Project”, which will address uranium mines that are permitted, but not operational and have not been reclaimed. These mines are safety and environmental hazards, and can be reopened with minimal permitting requirements.  The project will document conditions at inactive mine sites, including photos and radiation surveys, and document the failure of the BLM and DOGM to enforce their regulations.  Funds will be used to hire a consultant to gather data on these mines, and to pay for travel and printing costs.

 

 

  1. WaterLegacy, Minnesota

WaterLegacy is a Minnesota-based grassroots nonprofit formed to protect Minnesota’s waters and the communities that rely on them. WaterLegacy was founded in January 2009 in response to the imminent threat of acid mine drainage and metal leachate pollution from several proposed copper-nickel sulfide mines in northeastern Minnesota. WaterLegacy has grown to over 3,000 members, has been recognized by Philanthropedia as Minnesota’s #1 environmental start-up.

 

All funding received from the WMAN mini-grant will be used for legal advocacy and organizing to protect and enforce Minnesota’s Wild Rice Rule limiting sulfate discharge in wild rice waters.  This includes costs for legal counsel, travel and printing costs

 

  1. Wrangell Cooperative Association (WCA), Alaska

The WCA is the federally recognized tribe of the Stikine River region.  In 1992, the Dept. of the Interior approved WCA’s charter.  The tribe’s mission is to support the cultural, ceremonial, and subsistence lifestyle for all Alaskans and to promote the safe use and availability of a healthy environment for the present and future generations. WCA provides social services, employment, and educational opportunities to both the tribe and the Wrangell community.

 

Funds from WMAN mini-grant will pay for transportation and housing to bring 8-12 tribal leaders from Wrangell, Petersburg and tribal leaders in Telegraph Creek together in Telegraph, B.C, to begin sharing information, collaborating and developing an action plan to ensure the protection of the Stikine River from mining operations.  Specifically, funds will pay for an 8-hour jet boat commute for tribal leaders up and down the Stikine River to Telegraph Creek, as well as an airplane flight over mining sites.

Mini Grant Recipents - June 2012
  1. Advocates for the Protection of Sacred Sites (APOSS), California: APOSS is a community based organization, made up of Pitt River, Wintu, Yana, Shasta and other Native Peoples who live in their traditional territories of Northern California.

 

APOSS received a mini-grant to organize and host the Green Energy Justice Summit to bring together Indigenous community leaders to outline socially and environmentally just principles and recommendations on the appropriate development and use of “green” energy. Invited speakers and leaders will include Indigenous Peoples who have protected their lands from or have been impacted by so-called “green” energy development, including uranium mining and geothermal drilling.

 

  1. Alternatives North, Northwest Territories: Alternatives North is a social justice coalition operating in the Northwest Territories, Canada. Within their ranks are representatives of churches, organized labor, environmental organizations, women and family advocates and anti-poverty groups.  The organisation is entirely volunteer based.  Alternatives North is active mostly in Yellowknife, but maintains a larger e-mail distribution list that keeps members up to date on issues and activities.

 

Funding from WMAN and IEN will be used to support participation in the final public hearing of the ongoing Environmental Assessment of the Giant Mine Remediation Plan before the Mackenzie Valley Environmental Impact Review Board.  Specifically, they will use this funding to help cover expert participation and travel to present important research on precedent-setting issues and case studies of perpetual water quality treatment at mine sites.

 

  1. Amigos Bravos, New Mexico: Founded in 1988, Amigos Bravos is a statewide organization protecting the ecological and cultural integrity of New Mexico’s rivers and watersheds. They work to link environmental protection with social equity principles and are respected for their innovative approaches to solving river and water issues. Their leadership ensures that impacted communities have the technical knowledge and organizational capacity to defend the waters that sustain their societies and cultures.

 

Amigos Bravos was awarded $3,000 to defray technical expert costs for an administrative appeal of the Standby Permit renewal for the Mt Taylor uranium mine.  The appeal process will lay the basis for a likely court case aimed at defending the New Mexico Mining Act and public participation.

 

 

  1. Barriere Lake Solidarity, Quebec : Formed in 2008, Barriere Lake Solidarity (BLS) Montreal exists to support the Algonquins of Barriere Lake. BLS Montreal is a volunteer collective that facilitates Barriere Lake’s access to a larger public, helping raise public awareness about the community’s resistance to development threats to their land and assaults on their traditional governance.

 

Funds from WMAN-IEN will be used to resist the unwanted presence of Montreal-based mining company Copper One Inc. on Algonquin territory.  Part of this effort is the grassroots community engagement of youth via a multi-media project.  Other aspects of the project include a public education speaking tour and outreach to Copper One investors to leverage internal pressure at the corporation’s annual meeting.

 

  1. Castle Mountain Coalition (CMC), Alaska: CMC was founded in 2006 in response to the threat of large-scale coal development in the Matanuska Valley. Their mission is to protect the ecological integrity, economic sustainability, and quality of life within the Matanuska River watershed.

 

Funding will be used for planning a series of presentations and workshops on mountaintop removal (MTR) coal mining in Appalachia, the history of resistance to MTR, and the role of non-violent direct action in the movement to abolish MTR.  The goal is to learn as much as possible from the communities most impacted by surface mining of coal, and to use that knowledge in the struggle to prevent those impacts from happening to communities in Alaska.

 

  1. Children of the Taku, Alaska: Children of the Taku is an indigenous-led organization founded in May 2012. Their mission is to protect the Taku from harmful effects of industrial development, and specifically to halt the proposed Tulsequah Chief mine access road. They are based in Whitehorse, Yukon.

 

WMAN-IEN funds would largely be used to conduct public and media outreach designed to educate fellow Taku River Tlingit First Nation (TRTFN) members, and the public, about the negative effects of the road, with the goal of encouraging the TRTFN to oppose the road and mine project. The group will also conduct an outreach campaign targeting potential investors, educating them on the growing opposition to the road and the risks and uncertainties of the Tulsequah Chief Project.

 

  1. Clearfork Community Institute (CCI), Tennessee: CCI is an organization led by low-income women of the Tennessee coalfields. Founded in 1997, CCI built its credibility by tapping into the spirit of mountain women and their allies who have sought to provide a meaningful education for their children and communities. In 1997 they obtained two acres that were formerly home to the Blue Diamond Coal camp and turned it into the Clearfork Community Institute. Now the Institute is a functioning place-based community development education center.

 

CCI will use funding to focus on educating young adult interns about the legacy of rural Appalachia’s coalfields’ economy and how to build a healthier future. They will organize a summer young adult leadership program to better understand sense of place through the lens of the area’s historic economy (based on mining) and future opportunities.

 

  1. Coloradoans Against Resource Destruction (CARD), Colorado: CARD was founded in early 2007 to oppose a proposal to mine uranium in northern Colorado. CARD was successful in organizing resistance to the mine, educating citizens resulting in the passage of legislation slowing uranium mining, and eventually suspending local operations of the mine.  They continue to work with a number of other organizations, both as a coalition member within Colorado and by providing support for groups fighting other proposed uranium projects in the northern Great Plains region.

 

With funding from WMAN-IEN, CARD will gather six case studies for successful anti-mining efforts in the United States and Canada, and identify the factors that made those efforts successful.  These case studies will then be available to WMAN, IEN, and other network members, providing examples and concrete strategies for success.

 

  1. Couchiching First Nation, Ontario: The Couchiching First Nation is a member of the Treaty #3 Anishinaabe people of the Rainy River region in Ontario. Currently there are three mines in the Couchiching territory.

 

The Couchiching will use funds to host a day-long workshop on the environmental impacts of mining.  This educational event will provide the community with better information to make informed decisions about mining in the region.    The event will bring together governmental policy and technical expertise, and feature environmentalist and tribal elder discussions.

 

  1. Defenders of the Black Hills, South Dakota: Defenders was founded in August, 2002 by Indigenous people and non-indigenous small environmental organizations. Their mission is to protect, preserve, and restore the environment of the 1868 Fort Laramie Treaty Territory which includes all of western South Dakota, and parts of Montana, North Dakota, Wyoming, and Nebraska. Their projects include sacred sites protection, stopping mining impacts, and protection of water.

 

The project proposed for this grant is to fund a quarterly meeting concerned with cleaning up more than 3,000 abandoned uranium mines, and stopping a new gold mine from being built in the sacred Black Hills. This grant will help do a mass mailing, purchase copy materials, and provide for other meeting expenses.

 

  1. Friends of Blair Mountain, West Virginia: The Friends of Blair Mountain (FOBM) was formed in 2010 and is committed to saving Blair Mountain in Logan County, West Virginia from mountaintop removal coal mining. They commemorate and raise awareness of the historic Blair Mountain battlefield, with the ultimate goal of establishing it as a National Monument. [The 1921 Battle of Blair Mountain was the largest civil uprising on American soil since the U.S. Civil War. It was a spontaneous outpouring of rage and grief over conditions in the southern coalfields. Over the course of the disruption, between 10,000 and 15,000 coal miners assembled and armed themselves for a march over mountainous terrain to rescue illegally imprisoned miners in Mingo County.] Blair Mountain was nominated for the National Register of Historic Places in the late 1990’s and for a time was granted that designation. Efforts by the coal companies resulted in it being removed from the National Register. This battle is now being fought in the courts in a very long drawn out fashion. In the meantime, surface mining has continued.

 

Friends of Blair Mountain is requested funds from WMAN/IEN for the design, printing and postage costs for the first Blair Mountain Journal, which will be published twice each year.  The project also includes a membership drive to increase fundraising efforts and outreach to libraries all over West Virginia and Appalachia to become subscribers to the Journal.

 

  1. Great Lakes Caucus, Michigan: The WMAN Great Lakes Caucus is a collaboration among mining activist organizations in the Great Lakes basin (on both sides of the international border).

 

The Great Lakes Caucus is proposing to convene a mining activists’ meeting in Marquette, Michigan to contribute to the development of a common understanding of mining activities and impacts around the Great Lakes. The objectives of the Great Lakes Caucus meeting are to provide an opportunity for mining activists to unite and (1) share information resources, (2) build capacity/skills, and (3) identify effective communication tools and strategies for ongoing collaboration.

 

  1. International Indian Treaty Alliance, Alaska: The International Indian Treaty Council (IITC) is an organization of Indigenous Peoples working for human rights, environmental justice and self-determination for Indigenous Peoples and the recognition and protection of their rights, treaties, traditional cultures, and sacred lands.

 

This project will build on the partnership between the IITC, Chickaloon Village Tribal Citizens and Youth, Chickaloon Village Traditional Council, community members, and environmental groups in the local area defending against coal issues. This project goal is to host a media training to educate and share the impacts of coal mining in the local area through the production and distribution of a community led Public Service Announcement (PSA) Campaign. The training is scheduled for August 2012.

 

  1. Native Movement, Arizona: Native Movement is a national non-profit organization that supports culturally based leadership development and sustainability programs in the Southwest region of the United States and Alaska.  The overarching mission “is to help motivate young leaders toward balanced relations with each other, and Mother Earth”.

 

Native Movement sought funding for The Elders Video Recording Project. WMAN-IEN funds will be used to interview and record elders speaking about the legacy of uranium mining on indigenous lands in the US Southwest. The group seeks to use technology as a tool to responsibly rebuild cultural resiliency to ensure a sustainable and healthy global bio-cultural diversity.  The project includes: producing a website, a DVD series, and building a rapport between age groups.

 

  1. Southeast Alaska Conservation Council (SEACC), Alaska: Since 1970, SEACC has worked throughout Southeast Alaska to permanently protect biologically productive watersheds and wild areas important to communities, while fostering the development of sustainable communities.

 

This project aims to support intern staffing assistance for Alaskans for Responsible Mining, a coalition of communities, native organizations and conservation groups that has been working in Alaska for over 15 years to organize and educate the public on mining issues across Alaska.  SEACC is providing office space and resources for a 6-month intern but sought WMAN-IEN funding to assist with costs.

 

  1. Sept-Iles Sans Uranium (SISUR), Quebec: SISUR is a citizen-based group formed in 2008 to fight companies who sought to open uranium mines in the St-Laurent north shore and Sept-Îles areas of Québec.  The group quickly grew to more than 5,000 and the need for technical knowledge about uranium mining became evident. Their mission is to raise awareness of the effects of mining through outreach to the public and distribution of sound scientific data from around the world.

 

Funding from WMAN-IEN will be used for outreach and education with Cree Nation members on the effects of uranium mining.  Training will culminate in a presentation to the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission.

 

  1. Tsilhqot’in First Nation, British Columbia: The Tsilhqot’in National Government (TNG) was established in 1989 to meet the needs and represent six Tsilhqot’in First Nations communities in their effort to re-establish a strong political government structure. The TNG is fighting the proposed “Prosperity Mine”.

 

TNG seeks to protect Teztan Biny and its surrounding environment (Yanah Biny & Nabas) from proposed mining.  Funding will be used to plan a gathering from August 23-26, 2012 to discuss issues associated with the mine and develop community responses.

 

  1. Tyonek Native Village, Alaska: The peoples of Tyonek have thrived off the marine environment, rivers, and lands while residing along the beaches of the Cook Inlet for thousands of years. The Tyonek native peoples, referred to as the Tubughna “Beach People”, are located 35 air miles from Anchorage across the Cook Inlet in the village of Tyonek.  The village relies on a subsistence lifestyle that is centuries old, and wild, healthy salmon are a vital component of Tyonek’s traditional way of life.

 

Tyonek Native Village received WMAN-IEN funding in 2011 to build a tribally-driven campaign to stop the  Chuitna Coal Mine and protect the Chuitna River in the Cook Inlet watershed. The project has now received a 2012 grant for the second annual Big Lake Culture Camp with the focus on bringing together native youth from throughout the Cook Inlet to celebrate salmon and learn about potential negative impacts from coal development on water quality, climate change, salmon health and habitat, and on human health.

 

  1. Wisconsin Network for Peace and Justice (WNPJ), Wisconsin: WNPJ was formed in 1991 with a mission to facilitate activities, cooperation and communication among Wisconsin organizations and individuals working toward the creation of a sustainable world, free from violence and injustice. WNPJ seeks to build coalitions, engage the public, and wage campaigns through their Anti-militarism, Immigrant Rights and Environment Work Groups.

 

With funding, WNPJ will continue opposition to a proposed iron mine in northern Wisconsin, to educate people about the dangers of iron, metallic sulfide and frac- sand mining in Wisconsin.  They will achieve this through a campaign to educate the public about the range and extent of mining activities and proposals in Wisconsin; to develop and promote an informed critique of iron, metallic sulfide and frac sand mining, via educational materials, presentations and media outreach; and to build broad-based grassroots pressure to strengthen mining protections and pass legislation addressing the public health and environmental impacts of frac sand mining.

 

  1. Yellow Bird, Montana: Yellow Bird is an indigenous, grass roots organization, founded in 2006, on the Northern Cheyenne Reservation of Montana. Their mission is to provide programming to preserve traditional life-ways and language, to protect mother earth , and to create cultural understanding and integrity. Yellow Bird is dedicated to providing native cultural programming that empowers youth, families and communities to overcome adversities and strive for a better future.

 

Yellow Bird will utilize funding to sponsor a large public gathering on the Northern Cheyenne Reservation that will inform the community and Northern Cheyenne people about coal and coal development experienced by other tribes. The gathering will be held on August 12th, 2012, before a September 2012 tribal vote on coal development. Grant funds will involve travel costs for speakers/presenters (travel, lodging, etc.), marketing/advertising, supplies, and other meeting expenses.

 

  1. Protect Our Manoomin, Minnesota: Protect Our Manoomin (POM) is an indigenous, non-profit, grassroots organization composed of individuals from Minnesota Anishinaabe communities. Founded in 2011, their mission is to educate and inform tribal and non-tribal people of sulfide mining and its endangerment to wild rice and the environment.

 

POM will utilize funding to host a tribal mining forum, including speakers on cultural issues, legal issues (ceded lands), scientific issues (effects of sulfates on Manoomin), and economic issues in regard to sulfide mining.

 

 

Mini Grant Recipents - March 2012
  1. Black Mesa Water Coalition, Arizona: Black Mesa Water Coalition is dedicated to preserving and protecting the natural environment and the integrity of Indigenous Peoples’ cultures, with the vision of building sustainable and healthy communities. BMWC was formed in 2001 by a group of young inter-tribal, inter-ethnic people dedicated to addressing issues of water depletion, natural resource exploitation, and health promotion within Navajo and Hopi communities

 

The group will use funds to take a 15-person delegation, primarily young people, to Washington, DC to meet with Department of the Interior Secretary Salazar and other key leaders. The focus of the meeting is to urge leaders to remove the Bureau of Reclamation’s majority ownership of the Navajo Generating Station (which burns coal mined on Hopi and Navajo lands) and reinvest in renewable energy development on the Navajo Nation.

 

  1. Chickaloon Native Village, Alaska: Chickaloon Native Village is an Ahtna Dene’ Athabascan Indian Tribe that for millennia has nurtured and utilized the lands, plants and animals of south central Alaska. Their traditional territory has experienced dramatic changes affecting the way of life. Dating as far back as 1900, Chickaloon Native Village’s traditional territories have been subject to non-sustainable resource extraction including coal, copper and gold mining, oil and gas drilling, and logging. In response to these changes and pressures, the Tribe re-established the nine-member Chickaloon Village Traditional Council (CVTC) in 1973 to reassert the Tribe’s identity, cultural traditions, and economic self-sufficiency while protecting our ancestral homelands from further resource exploitation and destruction.

 

With WMAN-IEN funding, Chickaloon Native Village will send a Tribal representative to the Inaugural National Health Impact Assessment Meeting to be held April 3 and 4, 2012, in Washington, D.C.  The meeting will convene policy makers, public health professionals, Health Impact Assessment practitioners, and others with an interest in learning more about health assessments. Alaska Native participants will bring home information on how this tool might be used to gauge possible health impacts from proposed new mining on their native lands.

 

  1. Colorado Citizens Against ToxicWaste, Colorado: CCAT is a non-profit grassroots organization in Fremont County, Colorado, that formed March 7, 2002, after the Cotter Corporation Uranium Mill announced plans to import 450,000 tons of radioactive/toxic waste from the Maywood Chemical Works Superfund Site in New Jersey. They are a diverse volunteer group with a goal to educate about radioactive industrial operations that threaten the environment, property values, health, economy, tourism industry, and social well-being.

 

CCAT will hire a technical consultant to review and critique the closure and reclamation plans and otherwise assist with the cleanup of the Cotter Corporation Uranium Mill.  CCAT assisted in the successful passage of legislation in 2010 (The Uranium Processing Accountability Act), which contributed to the Cotter Corporation’s decision to close the mill, thus creating the current need for appropriate decommissioning and reclamation.

 

  1. Front 40, Michigan: Front 40 is a grassroots organization formed in 2003 in response to the threat of a metallic sulfide mine potentially being developed on the banks of the Menominee River in Lake Township, Michigan. The zinc, silver, gold, copper and lead ore body extends underneath the river into Wisconsin.  It is the principle objective of the Front 40 to ensure that metallic sulfide mining operations are not allowed to adversely impact rivers, lakes, groundwater and lands.

 

Front 40 will use funding to organize and develop outreach materials such as editorials, op-eds, and letters to the editor to inform the public about the dangers of proposed metallic sulfide mining. This mining threatens natural and cultural resources including Shakey Lakes Savanna and burial mounds and gardens. A specific focus will be to reach out across the border to Wisconsin citizens since the river the mine is proposed on is the border between the two states.

 

  1. Gifford Pinchot Task Force, Oregon: For more than 25 years the Gifford Pinchot Task Force’s mission has been to support the biological diversity and communities of the Northwest through conservation and restoration of forests, rivers, fish and wildlife. The GP Task Force is working to protect and restore these unique areas by integrating collaboration and restoration into the fabric of federal land management in the Northwest. The GP Task Force has over 4,000 members.

 

Funding will support a public outreach program dedicated to opposing a heavy metal open-pit mine directly adjacent to the Mount St. Helen’s National Monument.  Funding would go toward hiring professionals to assemble the necessary information on impacts of drilling, reconstructing road access for the drilling sites, and use of water for drilling.

 

  1. Information Network for Responsible Mining, Colorado: Founded in 2001,  objectives are to review all hardrock permitting and mining activities in the state, facilitate enforcement, influence state policy and regulations, advocate for best mining practices, provide information about mining to the public, and work with communities and organizations around Colorado on mining issues.

 

INFORM will co-host a Uranium Workshop in late spring in Moab, Utah, in order to gather uranium activists, share information and draw on lessons learned from opposition campaigns in Utah and Colorado while laying down a framework for cooperating on regional issues and meeting in a formal caucus later in the year. Presentations and discussions will be combined with the opportunity to see some of the only conventional uranium development occurring in the United States.

 

  1. Kitchenuhmaykoosib Inninuwug, Ontario: The mission of KI Lands and Environment Unit, a department of the KI First Nation, is to preserve and protect the Kitchenuhmaykoosib Inninuwug’s Homelands from environmentally destructive human activities that will adversely affect the human, cultural, and ecological health. They have been at the forefront of protecting lands and resources that are at threat of domination by outside governments and industries.

 

KI will use funds to produce a series of videos and photo-essays documenting traditional uses of indigenous lands and the community’s ongoing efforts to protect and preserve the land from impacts associated with a proposed gold mine. Funding will cover expenses for the production, and post-production, of the documentary work.

 

  1. Lynn Canal Conservation, Alaska: The mission of Lynn Canal Conservation (LCC) in the Chilkat Valley is to promote ecosystem integrity, protect quality of life and foster environmental awareness. For over 40 years, Lynn Canal Conservation has been instrumental in many successful grassroots efforts that have resulted in protecting ecosystems and quality of life for those who live in and around the Chilkat Valley.

 

LCC will utilize funds for public education and outreach on environmental risks and impacts of sulfide mines. Grant funds will be used for presentations, production of media and materials, publicity and advertising, travel and other expenses related to bringing this information to greater public attention.

 

  1. Multicultural Alliance for a Safe Environment, New Mexico: MASE is a coalition of communities in northwestern New Mexico that work to address the legacy of uranium contamination and stop any future mining projects.  The coalition is three years old, but the community groups that comprise it our have been involved in uranium struggles for decades.  The group is active in community organizing, lobbying, policy, and legal and technical battles.

 

Funding has been requested to host a multi-cultural Environmental Justice Summit for young people this July to engage them in work against uranium mining, to encourage collaboration, and to provide them with community organizing training.

 

  1. Native Aspirations, Wisconsin: Native Aspirations was established in Bad River in January, 2011. The mission of the program is to encourage traditional tribal practices or interventions in order to respond to youth violence, bullying and suicide risk.  The goal of the program is to employ interventions that are grounded in cultural values and spiritual practices and ceremonies.

 

With mini-grant funds, Native Aspirations wants to begin to expand its programming to provide environmental education to Bad River youth to help them understand the relationship between water quality and mining.  This project is also designed to build confidence and positive leadership skills in Bad River youth attending school in a community that is culturally divided on the issue of mining.

 

  1. Owe Aku / Bring Back the Way, South Dakota: Owe Aku, a Lakota term meaning “Bring Back the Way”, was founded in 1997 as a grassroots social change organization dedicated to the preservation and revitalization of the Lakota Way of Life, the 1851 and 1868 Ft. Laramie Treaty Rights, and human rights. Their work goes beyond the Oglala band of the Lakota Nation and the Pine Ridge Homeland, to the Lakota Nation and the Oceti Sakowin: the Seven Council Fires, known historically (although incorrectly) as the “Great Sioux Nation”.

 

Owe Aku requested funds to educate and encourage support for the campaign to stop uranium mining on the Great Plains. Through events and web engagement, the project will bring together activists and Native Americans across regional, socio-economic and cultural boundaries, to inform and inspire collective and thoughtful action aimed at stopping destructive mining from contaminating native and non-native water.

 

  1. Red Water Pond Road Community Association, New Mexico: The Red Water Pond Road Community Association (RWPRCA) is a grass-roots organization of Diné families who are experiencing and living with the impacts of uranium mining waste and milling in the Northeast Church Rock mining area since the 1960s. The association was founded April 7, 2007, two days after the Navajo Nation ordered families to temporarily leave their homes while federal regulators removed radioactive soil.

 

Their mission is to restore environmental health and human health in their community and protect and preserve their natural and cultural environment.   Funding will be used to complete a comprehensive health study to assess the impacts of uranium mining waste to the environment and human health. The project will ensure that the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring will include both Western and Traditional perspectives.

 

  1. Tallahassee Area Community, Colorado: TAC was formed in February 2008 in response to an Australian mining company’s conducting unlawful uranium exploration activities in the community. The organization currently has approximately 200 members. Its purpose is to advocate for a clean and safe environment in Western Fremont County, Colorado and to represent those residents whose water quantity and quality will be at risk as a result of any uranium mining and milling activity.

 

TAC will utilize funds to help defray court costs associated with determining ownership of water rights in response to the mining company’s planned application for a uranium mining permit.  This community group contends that the proposed mine will adversely affect water supply, contaminate the quality of the water in the surrounding tributaries, and also impact the Arkansas River that the county relies upon for fishing and tourism.

 

  1. Wisconsin Resources Protection Council, Wisconsin: The WRPC was founded in 1982 to help counter the lack of information about the effects of large-scale metallic sulfide mining on Wisconsin’s precious water supplies, on the tourism and dairy industries, and upon the many Native American communities that are located near potential mine sites. Since that time the Council has broadened its concern to include peoples and resources throughout the Lake Superior region, including Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota and Ontario. Members share a common goal: to educate the public about the consequences of allowing international mining corporations to develop a new mining district in the Lake Superior region under the present legal and regulatory framework.

 

WRPC requested funds for legal and scientific research costs related to a case in federal court regarding Clean Water Act violations by Flambeau Mining Company (a subsidiary of Kennecott Minerals/Rio Tinto) at their mine near Ladysmith, Wisconsin.

 

Note: This funding was made through an “emergency grant”, granted between cycles due to the time-sensitive nature of the work and particular need.

 

  1. Yellow Dog Watershed Preserve, Michigan:  This organization was created in 1995 by a group of local citizens who were concerned about unchecked resource extraction and the lack of community involvement in the health of the watershed. Since its inception, this group has brought a voice to those living in the watershed. Their mission is to preserve and protect the Yellow Dog River and its surrounding watersheds for the benefit of present and future generations. Goals include: to collect information for best land use practices, advocate for wise use of resources, educate students, develop current and future stewards of the land, and permanently protect the integrity wilderness.

 

The Preserve will publish photographs documenting the transition of this rural watershed to an industrial complex. The group will also develop a special insert to their widely-distributed newsletter highlighting their upcoming plans to invest in additional monitoring techniques to ensure ecological integrity of the watershed.

 

Mini Grant Recipents - October 2011

October 2011

 

 

  1. Action for the Environment, South Dakota: for travel to the state capitol for public meetings to comment on decisions of whether to expand cyanide process mining in the northern Black Hills

 

  1. Arizona Mining Reform: for educational outreach to generate comments from across the nation related to a Canadian company’s proposed mine near Tuscon, Arizona

 

  1. Blue Ridge Environmental Defense League, Virginia: to hire a hydrogeologist to review potential water quality impacts from a new uranium mine proposal and to consider the broader implications of an associated push to lift Virginia’s statewide ban against uranium mining

 

  1. Clean Water Alliance, South Dakota: for public education materials and mailings related to a new rare earths mine with radioactive tailings’ potential, and the associated cumulative impacts of six other regional uranium mines/proposals

 

  1. Committee for Future Generations, Saskatchewan: for youth organizing and other public outreach to encourage a dialogue about the impacts of uranium mining and waste disposal in the world’s largest uranium producing region

 

  1. Concerned Citizens of Penobsquis, New Brunswick: to prepare for a presentation in front of the New Brunswick mining commissioner regarding lost drinking water at residential homes, farmland, and lost property value from area potash mines and natural gas wells

 

  1. Dine Care, Arizona: for production of several videos to be broadcast to electric-rate payers in Arizona, New Mexico and California receiving power generated by the coal mining and power plants in the surrounding Navajo Nation

 

  1. Friends of the Land of Keweenaw (FOLK), Michigan: to compile research and host a series of associated public forums regarding new mine development proposed in the western region of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan and also in the surrounding region of Ontario, Minnesota and Wisconsin

 

  1. Ground Truth Trekking, Alaska: to create an interactive “super map” of Alaskan mining projects, to display on their website and freely distribute to groups and individuals who wish to download it and add it to their own websites

 

  1. Hamlet of Arctic Bay, Nunavut: for a case study of mineral development in the high Arctic focusing on the socio-economic, cultural, and environmental implications of the operation of a lead/zinc mine at Nanisvik, near Arctic Bay, Nunavut, including an investigation of the initial rationale for the establishment of Nanisivik, and to what extent promised or suggested community benefits from the mine were met

 

  1. Indigenous Network on Economies and Trade, British Columbia: to host and provide a venue for Indigenous Peoples who question mining and want prior informed consent before a mine is developed; this Indigenous Peoples Assembly will coincide with a 19th Annual Conference of the Canadian Aboriginal Mineral Association

 

  1. Mining Impact Coalition of Wisconsin, Wisconsin: for research and development of reports, public handouts, and a newsletter on the current value of water and wildlife resources and the impacts of large-scale taconite mining

 

  1. Plains Justice, Montana: to update and maintain the CoalDiver website (coaldiver.org) which provides easy access for advocates, journalists, and others seeking information about western coal development; the site also features unique interactive tools to help users grasp the scale of western coal strip mining

 

  1. Save the Scenic Santa Ritas, Arizona: to produce a series of short video vignettes, and associated material, to illustrate local residents’ concerns with the proposed Rosemont mine near Tucson, Arizona

 

  1. Secwepemc Nation Youth Network, British Columbia: for outreach materials, organizing and a mural project to make a billboard mural on their reservation, along the Trans Canada Hwy, to outreach to the 10,000+ motorists per day on the impacts of proposed lead/zinc mining to sockeye salmon and indigenous land values generally

 

  1. Sipaulovi Development Corporation, Arizona: for Hopi elders and youth interns to work together in the monitoring of six to eight village springs where, recently, the water flow decreased or ceased potentially due to area mining drawing down the aquifer and using a high volume of surface water

 

  1. Unit 2 Hypha Films and Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, Michigan: for a collaboration between independent filmmakers and the KBIC to develop a video short to build awareness within the KBIC and other communities in the region (and as the first step towards a broader documentary envisioned centered on the Great Lakes Region as a whole) focused on the threat to 19% of the world’s fresh water supply due to the cumulative impacts of previous, current, and proposed regional mining

 

  1. Water Legacy, Minnesota: for legal assistance and map development related to upholding Minnesota’s “Wild Rice Rule,” which limits sulfate pollution in wild rice waters and protects fish, other aquatic life, and humans from toxic methylation of mercury, a potent neurotoxin

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