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Stop the Lumad Killings

The Lumad are indigenous people in the southern Mindanao region of the Philippines. The term Lumad is short for Katawhang Lumad (Literally: “indigenous people”), a description officially adopted by delegates of the Lumad Mindanao Peoples Federation founding assembly on June 26, 1986. This grew out of a political awakening among tribes during the martial law regime of President Marcos and reflects the collective identify of 18 Lumad ethnic groups. The assembly’s main objectives was to achieve self-determination and governance for their member-tribes within their ancestral domain in accordance with their culture and customary laws.

The Lumad have a traditional ancestral concept of land ownership which is communal private property. Community members have the right utilize any piece of unoccupied land within the communal territory. Lumad ancestral lands include rain forests, hunting grounds, cultivated and uncultivated land and valuable mineral resources (copper, nickel, gold, chromite, coal, gas, cement) below the land.

The GOP & Trump Administration’s Last Attack on Indigenous Rights of 2017

The Tax Reform Bill Opens the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge for Oil and Gas Drilling, Putting Alaskan Natives at Further Risk of Climate Disaster and Harms The Natural Resources They Depend On

Washington D.C. -Today the Republican House and Senate passed the Republican Tax Reform Bill, a bill that has seen unprecedented disapproval by American citizens. According to The Hill, “Public polling on the GOP’s tax overhaul indicates support hovering at less than 30 percent, which is even lower than the favorability toward ObamaCare when Democrats passed it in 2010”. In addition, every democrat from both chambers opposed the bill.

The primary goal of the bill is to cut taxes, but the bill will also repeal the Affordable Care Act’s individual mandate and will open the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) in Northern Alaska for oil and gas drilling.

Joint Statement on the US Army Corps of Engineers’ Approval of the Bayou Bridge Pipeline

Yesterday, December 14, 2017, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers granted permits to Bayou Bridge, LLC, a subsidiary of Energy Transfer Partners, to construct a 162.5-mile crude oil pipeline from Lake Charles to St. James, Louisiana. The Army Corps of Engineers refused to conduct a full Environmental Impact Statement for the project, despite pleas for such a study from communities directly impacted by the pipeline.

Cherri Foytlin, Bold Louisiana said: “To be honest, my hopes were never with the state and federal agencies who have consistently proven their lack of vision and scarcity of protection for the people and waters of this great state. The idea that this company, Energy Transfer Partners, who has destroyed land and water all over the United States, who carry the designation of “worst spill record,” who has created and maintained space for human rights abuses upon peaceful people – that they would be allowed to endanger over 700 of our waterways for their own profit is not only inconceivable, but proof of a moral bankruptcy within our systems of environmental protections. Yet, this is where we are. And while I am saddened by the news, I am equally sure that we will stand together as the mothers, fathers, sisters, and brothers, to peacefully endeavor to right the wrong of these misguided and foolish permittings.”

Indigenous Grassroots Activists Respond to the FCC Repealing Net Neutrality

Native nations, and Indigenous communities and organizations have used social media and internet-based communications as a means to highlight our struggles. Imagine the months at Standing Rock without live feeds or social media. The power of the world’s Indigenous Peoples coming together was made possible, in large part, by equal access to the internet. This decision could potentially harm our ability to organize as we depend on various websites to mobilize and to share our stories from the front lines. What’s more is that grassroots organizations often operate on small budgets. If fees become mandatory for the use of certain websites, grassroots organizations may struggle even more to operate. Our effort to build a sustainable and just society extends to all aspects of the commons, which includes the internet. We will stay committed to supporting the battle for net neutrality and digital civil rights.

Senators Warren, Merkley, and Udall Join the Gwich’in Indigenous Pray-In Against GOP Tax Bill

Washington, DC — Leaders from the Gwich’in Nation and Inupiaq Tribe traveled from northern Alaska and the Yukon Territory in Canada today to lead a pray in against the tax bill and urge Congress to drop drilling in the Arctic from the bill. Senator Elizabeth Warren, Senator Jeff Merkley, Senator Mark Udall, and Representative Alan Lowenthal all came out to support and joined the call to stop Arctic drilling.

The Gwich’in Nation of Alaska and Canada have always and will continue to subsist on the Porcupine Caribou herd, whose calving grounds are in the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. The place is vital for the survival of the Gwich’in and Inupiaq people. Today marked the 57th anniversary of the Refuge.

Trump Attacks Sacred Sites and Indigenous Rights By Lifting Protections From The Bears Ears National Monument

Salt Lake City, UT – On Monday, December 1st, during a brief visit to Utah, President Trump announced plans to shrink the Bears Ears and the Grand Staircase Escalante National Monuments in Utah. This is the largest removal of federal land protection in the nation’s history. In 2016, President Obama designated the Bears Ears region as a national monument, after five local tribes led a decade long campaigns to ensure the protection of these ancestral lands.

Shortly after Trump’s announcement, an inter-tribal coalition, comprised of the Ute Mountain Tribe, the Ute Indian Tribe, the Navajo Nation, the Hopi and the Zuni, filed the first lawsuit against the executive order on the basis that President Trump does not have the legal authority to remove the national monument protections.
Within the Bears Ears National Monument there are over 100,000 sacred sites and this region continues to provide cultural knowledge and value to the surrounding tribes. Indigenous Peoples still need these lands for ceremony, to harvest plants medicines, and to ensure that their traditions thrive. Secretary Ryan Zinke, Senator Orrin Hatch, and President Trump did not meet with tribal representatives to hear their arguments for maintaining the national monument, nor did they receive consent from these tribes to remove the protections. This is a direct violation of the nation to nation relationship that the federal government should maintain with sovereign tribal nations.

U.S. Senate Tax Bill Will Have Devastating Impacts on the Alaska Native Gwich’in Peoples’

Bemidji, MN – Before dawn on Saturday morning, December 2nd, the U.S. Senate passed a monumental tax overhaul with no Democratic support that overwhelmingly benefits corporations and the top 1%. The bill, written by a small panel of Republicans, behind closed doors was rushed to a vote, bypassing regular order that would have included hearings and committee meetings with both parties participating. In fact, the bill has ignited an outcry from Democrats, calling this process of the bill, “Washington at it’s worst”.

While the focus of criticism is centered on how the bill will not benefit a majority of taxpayers in the long term, there are immediate and potentially dire impacts within this bill for Indigenous Peoples that is being overlooked in the media. Two provisions inserted by Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) direct Sec. Zinke to approve at least two lease sales for drilling. Each would consist of no fewer than 400,000 acres and 2,000 acres (of the 800,000 total acres), known as 1002 Area, set aside for wells and support facilities within ANWR’s 1.5 million-acre coastal plain.

Rights Based Law for Systematic Change

It is time to stop thinking we must protect nature and recognize that as much as every other life form on Earth, we are nature. We cannot separate ourselves from the water we drink, the food we eat or the air we breathe any more than we can care for just a single leaf on a tree. And yet, human law almost everywhere defines “nature” as property to be owned, commodified and destroyed at will for human profit. Most of the destruction of the Earth is sanctioned by law—from blowing the tops of mountains for coal; to fracturing the earth for oil and natural gas; to clear cutting the Amazon and displacing Indigenous communities. In so doing we are defying Natural Law that governs the planet’s life systems. Climate disruption is the direct result of human activities pushing beyond the limits of Natural Law.

To avert the worst impacts of the climate crisis and move toward a planet in balance, we must challenge the idea that Earth’s living systems are property and change our legal frameworks to adhere to the natural laws of the Earth. Recognizing Rights of Nature means that human activities and development must not interfere with the ability of ecosystems to absorb their impacts, to regenerate their natural capacities, to thrive and evolve, and requires that those responsible for destruction, including corporate actors and governments be held fully accountable.

Nebraska Approves KXL Route: Indigenous Groups Respond

Lincoln, NE – Today, November 20, 2017, the Nebraska Public Service Commission (NPSC) announced their approval of the permit for the Keystone XL (KXL) Pipeline to cross through the state. Nebraska was one of the last strongholds in the fight to prevent KXL from being completed. This announcement comes just days after the KXL pipeline leaked 210,000 gallons of oil in South Dakota and after the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change COP23, where Indigenous Peoples from across the world have spent two weeks advocating to stop new oil development and to keep fossil fuels in the ground. In addition, today, November 20th, marks the anniversary of the night the US National Guard and North Dakota Law Enforcement used water cannons on peaceful protesters at Standing Rock in subzero temperatures to protect the interests of Energy Transfer Partners.

Even with this decision, TransCanada has an uphill battle moving forward. The NPSC rejected TransCanada’s preferred route, so TransCanada will have to go through a new planning process for new pumping stations, acquire new easements from landowners, and there’s an opportunity for pipeline fighters to demand a new environmental impact statement for the new route segments.

The Paris Agreement Does Not Recognize Indigenous Rights

November 17, 2017, The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change 23rd Session of the Conference of the Parties (COP 23) has come to an end. And while progress has been made on the UNFCCC traditional knowledge Platform for engagement of local communities and Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Peoples’ rights are not fully recognized in the final platform document of COP 23. The burden of implementation falls on local communities and indigenous peoples.

Indigenous Environmental Network and Climate Justice Alliance to Launch “Carbon Pricing Report” at UN Climate Talks

While city, state, and national leaders gather at the UN Climate Talks to launch and implement platforms and agendas that promote carbon trading, carbon offsets, and REDD+, the Indigenous Environmental Network and the Climate Justice Alliance take a bold stance to reject and challenge these so-called innovative solutions by releasing the “Carbon Pricing Report: A Critical Perspective for Community Resistance”.

Joye Braun on the Wakpa Waste Camp and the Fight to Stop the Keystone XL Pipeline

The water protectors camp, called the Wakpa Waste Camp, continues to stand in protection of water that threatens the Cheyenne River Sioux tribe including continuing to stand against the Dakota Access pipeline, and against the proposed Keystone XL pipeline. If built, the Keystone XL pipeline would would carry Tar Sands crude from Alberta and come within less than 1-mile of the Cheyenne River Sioux tribe’s boundaries.

Last Real Indian’s editor Matt Remle recently spoke with veteran water protector Joye Braun about the Wakpa Waste camp and fight against the Keystone XL pipeline. For those who are unaware of the water protectors camp at Cheyenne River tell us more about the camp.

White House Event at UN Climate Talks Overshadowed by Indigenous, Black and, Latinx Water and Land Ceremony

Indigenous Peoples from across the world who represent both low income communities and communities impacted first and hardest by climate change, led a demonstration of song and prayer at the White House event to send a clear message: Keeping coal and nuclear in our energy mix is in complete contradiction to any meaningful climate action plan. The promotion of coal and nuclear power by the United States has serious global impacts and is not an acceptable solution to mitigate and adapt to climate change.

Rights of Nature Emerges as Strong Alternative to Climate Mitigation and Adaptation Framework

In a new report released in Bonn, Rights of Nature: Rights-Based Law for Systemic Change, the authors point to a fast-growing body of international law that seeks to change how decisions about the climate and ecosystem protection are made. “Climate disruption is the direct result of human activities pushing beyond the limits of Natural Law,” the editors note, “Recognizing the Earth as a living system of which humans are a part, rather than as human property to be owned and destroyed is a fundamental shift from the climate capitalism embedded in the DNA of trade deals, environmental policies and treaties around the world—including the Paris Agreement.”

Indigenous & Grassroots Organizations at COP23

Bonn, Germany – In one week the It Takes Roots Delegation, a U.S. coalition, will journey to Bonn, Germany for the UNFCCC Climate Change Convention.* This past year the Trump administration has not only backed out of the Paris Agreement but has also made an oil executive secretary of state and has nominated a climate denier to be the head of NASA. These decisions are putting Indigenous and Black and Brown communities at severe risk of climate change impacts and extreme weather.

First Nations organizing leads to TransCanada Ending Its East Energy East Pipeline and Eastern Mainline proposals.

Energy East Project was a major concern for the safety of our waterways, fish, vegetation, animals plus our people who reside next to the Wolastoq (St. John river).

Please recognize this is a partial victory. We can celebrate our success here in the east coast although we need not overlook our Indigenous Sisters and Brothers in the west coast who must deal with the Kinder Morgan Pipeline that was authorized by the Trudeau government. Here in Wolastoq Homeland, we will continue to support the western Indigenous Nations as they resist the Kinder Morgan Pipeline.”

Grassroots Leaders and Community Members March to Kelcy Warren’s Home

Dallas, TX — On Friday, September 8th, 2017, the #STOPETP coalition rallied at the headquarters of Energy Transfer Partners. The rally featured speakers who traveled from the Dakotas, Pennsylvania, Louisiana and other communities who are impacted by ETP’s pipelines. Following the rally, organizers of the event led a march to Kelcy Warren’s home, the CEO of Energy Transfer Partners. As the CEO of Energy Transfer Partners, Warren is responsible for the many violations committed in the construction and operation of his company’s pipelines. He and his company are also responsible for using illegal counter-terrorist tactics on Indigenous Peoples and their allies during the Standing Rock movement.

StopETP Coalition Rallies at Energy Transfer Partners HQ in Dallas

Despite unprecedented protest of the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) and being charged for many violations during the construction of DAPL, Energy Transfer Partners continues to expand its operations across the United States. From North Dakota to Pennsylvania, from Ohio to Louisiana, from Michigan to Texas, ETP violates Indigenous sovereignty, human and environmental rights. “Enough is enough. Across the country, Energy Transfer Partners steals land, poisons air and water, and trashes the climate,” said Yolonda Blue Horse, Society of Native Nations. “But the buck stops here. We’ve come together today to say ‘Stop.’ Stop the violence, stop the pollution, #StopETP.”